Editors' Picks A selection of stories handpicked by NPR Music editors.

Editors' Picks

Dave Grohl performs onstage during the taping of the 2021 "Vax Live" fundraising concert at the in Inglewood, Calif. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

Dave Grohl retraces his life-affirming path from Nirvana to Foo Fighters

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Yoko Ono's Plastic Ono Band is centered on her unique and powerful voice; even decades after its release, it still sounds utterly fearless. Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Apple Records hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Apple Records

Joan Wasser turned a prolific session-player career into her own band, Joan as Police Woman. Her latest album, The Solution Is Restless, began as a marathon jam with Afrobeat innovator Tony Allen. Giles Clement/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Giles Clement/Courtesy of the artist

Adele sings in front of Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles during a televised concert to promote her fourth album, 30, which chronicles the aftermath of her divorce in ways that take subtle chances with the star's signature cathartic style. Cliff Lipson/Getty Images hide caption

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Cliff Lipson/Getty Images

Santigold's self-titled debut combines "look what I can do" attitude with a galvanizing magic. Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Downtown Records hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Downtown Records

Paul McCartney, shown here in 1963, says the initial rush of Beatlemania "was the fulfillment of all our dreams." Fiona Adams/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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Fiona Adams/Redferns/Getty Images

Paul McCartney knew he'd never top The Beatles — and that's just fine with him

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"Some of the work is deliberately remaining outside of the structure," says musician and advocate Lilli Lewis of the efforts of Black musicians to make it in country and roots music industries. "We want to center different values and it's really difficult to do that from inside." Lewis just released a new album called Americana. David Villalta/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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David Villalta/Courtesy of the artist

New roots: Black musicians and advocates are forging coalitions outside the system

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Author of Hip Hop (And Other Things) Shea Serrano. Larami Serrano/Grand Central Publishing hide caption

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Larami Serrano/Grand Central Publishing

Shea Serrano answers existential questions about rap in 'Hip Hop (And Other Things)'

Author and host of the No Skips podcast Shea Serrano gets obsessive about things — movies, basketball, and now, rap. In Hip Hop (And Other Things), he dives into Cardi B's explosive 2018, the early days of Missy Elliott's career, and the 1995 Source Awards, which he says remains — to this day — one of the biggest nights in rap history.

Shea Serrano answers existential questions about rap in 'Hip Hop (And Other Things)'

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PinkPantheress Brent McKeever/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Brent McKeever/Courtesy of the artist

PinkPantheress reimagines garage music for a new generation

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Tracy Chapman's debut album "was the music that I needed at a time when I felt pressure to know everything before it was taught," says writer and scholar Francesca T. Royster. Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Elektra Records hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Elektra Records

"My music is where I'm able to release feelings and have fun with it," Wolf tells NPR. "I love for my shows to be a big party. So when I'm performing, if it's my release, I want it to be a release for other people." Alma Rosaz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alma Rosaz/Courtesy of the artist

Sufjan Stevens and Angelo De Augustine Daniel Anum Jasper/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Daniel Anum Jasper/Courtesy of the artist

Sufjan Stevens and Angelo De Augustine on World Cafe

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In the third part of our series exploring crossover in pop music, we reexamine the so-called "Latin explosion" of the '90s: what it was supposed to be for audiences across the U.S., and what it actually came to represent. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

A pioneer of the modern music festival, George Wein co-founded the Newport Jazz and Newport Folk festivals and helped launch the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. He died Sept. 13 at 95. Jonathan Chimene/WBGO hide caption

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Jonathan Chimene/WBGO