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The Prudent Man Rule

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The Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant was scheduled to be shuttered in 2025. But California Governor Gavin Newsom now wants to expand its lifespan. Michael Macor/The San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Macor/The San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Student loan borrowers stage a rally in front of The White House on Aug. 25 to celebrate President Biden cancelling student debt. The plan has sparked heated debate, including about its economic fairness. Paul Morigi/Getty Images for We the 45m hide caption

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Paul Morigi/Getty Images for We the 45m

Is it fair to forgive student loans? Examining 3 of the arguments of a heated debate

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President Joe Biden speaks about student loan debt forgiveness in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2022, in Washington. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona listens at right. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

What You Need To Know About Biden's Plan to Forgive Student Loan Debt

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What to know if you're hoping for student loan cancellation

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China's global lending binge

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More than two years ago, then-presidential candidate Joe Biden pledged to cancel at least $10,000 in federal student loans. The pledge has followed his administration ever since. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Biden is canceling up to $10K in student loans, $20K for Pell Grant recipients

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Jill Mallen gets her groceries at a food pantry because of soaring inflation. She says she's a "confused" voter — a registered Democrat who feels Republicans did a better job of managing the economy. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

As Inflation Eases, Food Prices Soar

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Electric vehicles are displayed at a news conference with White House Climate Adviser Gina McCarthy and Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg in Washington, D.C., on April 22, 2021. The Biden administration's climate and health care bill passed by Congress last week revamps a tax credit for buyers of electric cars. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

You can get a $7,500 tax credit to buy an electric car, but it's really complicated

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Back-to-school stress is amplified by inflation affecting the cost of supplies

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The IRS will look into options to create a free tax filing system

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Starbucks says regional staff of the National Labor Relations Board repeatedly crossed the line of neutrality to help union organizers in Kansas. Here, activists protest against Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz in New York City last month. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

After years of carrying medical debt from the premature birth of her daughter, Terri Logan recently discovered a nonprofit called RIP Medical Debt had paid off her bills. Juan Diego Reyes for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for KHN and NPR

This group's wiped out $6.7 billion in medical debt, and it's just getting started

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A new poll finds white adults are more than twice as likely as others to get sizable financial help from parents or grandparents. By contrast, Black adults are more likely to give money to elders. Tracy J. Lee for NPR hide caption

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Tracy J. Lee for NPR

Here's one reason why America's racial wealth gap persists across generations

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