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Kathleen McAuliffe, a home care worker for Catholic Charities in a Portland, Maine, suburb, helps client John Gardner with his weekly chores. McAuliffe shops for Gardner's groceries, cleans his home and runs errands for him during her weekly visit. Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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A Hospital Charged More Than $700 For Each Push Of Medicine Through Her IV

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Jonathan Caballero is among the millions of workers who are rethinking how they want to live their lives after the pandemic. He has found a new job that won't require a long commute. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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As The Pandemic Recedes, Millions Of Workers Are Saying 'I Quit'

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Dozens of people in Micronesia are suing the Bank of Guam for seizing stimulus checks they deposited. The bank did so to help the IRS recover tax payments issued in error. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Overseas Bank Helped Recover IRS Stimulus Checks To Non-Americans. It Didn't Go Well

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Marissa Lovell had hoped to buy her small Boise, Idaho, rental home until the price shot up by nearly $100,000 amid the coronavirus pandemic. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Homebuyers Squeezed As Western States See Prices Double Or More In Last Decade

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A physical imitation of the Bitcoin cryptocurrency is pictured with a $1 bank note. Cryptocurrencies are plunging over a range of factors, including the spillover impact from falling stock markets and fears about increased regulations. Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images

Bitcoin Is Plunging. What To Know About The Wild Ride In Cryptocurrencies

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A record shortage of homes for sale and strong demand from buyers are sparking bidding wars and sending home prices to new records. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

It's Harder Than Ever To Buy A House, And Bidding Wars Keep Breaking Out

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Anchorage, Alaska, resident Hans Dow built his own sawmill and began milling his own boards after lumber prices skyrocketed over the past year. Emily Schwing for NPR hide caption

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Emily Schwing for NPR

As Lumber Prices Climb, DIYers Cut Out The Middle Man And Mill Their Own

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A screen shows canceled incoming flights at T.F. Green International Airport in Warwick, R.I., on March 30, 2020. Consumer advocates and two senators say airlines are sitting on nearly $15 billion in refunds owed to customers for canceled travel. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Complaints Soar As Customers Fight Airlines For Refunds From Pandemic Cancellations

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A bartender mixes a drink inside a bar last week in San Francisco. The latest retail sales data out on Friday showed an increase in sales at restaurants and bars as more people venture out amid the continued reopening of the U.S. economy. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tia Cunningham says she was able to get out of subsidized housing and use the money as a down payment to buy a house. Imani Khayyam for NPR hide caption

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Imani Khayyam for NPR

More Cities Are Handing People Cash With No Strings Attached. Here's Why

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People who need help getting to a vaccination site will be able to get free or discounted rides through Uber and Lyft, the White House says. Here, a woman receives her first dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a mass vaccination site in Aberdeen, Md., after getting a ride to the site from her landlord. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images