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Regan Adams at her home in northeast Knoxville. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

Home prices are up. For Black families, is selling Grandma's house the right choice?

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Wanda Olson poses for a photo in Villa Rica, Ga., on Dec. 17. When Olson's son-in-law died in March after contracting COVID-19, she and her daughter had to grapple with more than just their sudden grief. They had to come up with money for a cremation. Even without a funeral, the bill came to nearly $2,000, a hefty sum that Olson initially covered. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

Americans have gotten raises. But with inflation, is it really a raise?

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Federal rent money finally got to renters, and eviction filings haven't gone up

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How to get ready to repay your student loan when the payment freeze ends

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Nicole Howson and her family stand in front of their new home in Griffin, Ga. Clockwise: Nicole Howson, Israel Epps, Talysa Epps and Latroun Epps. Lynsey Weatherspoon/NPR hide caption

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In a hot market, you can buy a home with cash — even if you don't have a lot of it

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Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., leaves his office after speaking with President Biden about his long-stalled domestic agenda, at the Capitol on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

President Biden walks to Marine One outside the White House on Dec. 2. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Biden pledged to forgive $10,000 in student loan debt. Here's what he's done so far

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Flood insurance rates are skyrocketing in inland locations

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Gas, groceries and no room for mistakes – Americans are feeling inflation

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HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra says doctors who are balking at the rules of the No Surprises Act aren't looking out for patients. "I don't think when someone is overcharging that it's going to hurt the overcharger to now have to [accept] a fair price," Becerra says. The Congressional Budget Office estimates the Biden team's rules would push insurance premiums down by 0.5% to 1%. Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

Lauren Barber stands in her home in Columbus, Ohio, on Nov. 16. Barber has been inundated with offers from investors and companies that want to buy her house. She sometimes gets called or texted more than five times a day with offers. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Hey, I want to buy your house: Homeowners besieged by unsolicited offers

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Some doctors, medical associations and members of Congress are complaining that the rule released by the Biden administration this fall for implementing the law to stop surprise medical bills actually favors insurers and doesn't follow the spirit of the legislation. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Charities have always accepted cash and coins. Now, they're giving cash directly to help people in need. jsmith/Getty Images hide caption

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Three reasons more charities are giving people cash (And one reason not to).

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High gas prices are posted at a gas station in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Nov. 7. Gas prices are surging across the country yet there's effectively little the Biden administration can do. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Gasoline prices are surging. Can Biden actually do something about it?

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