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Starbucks says regional staff of the National Labor Relations Board repeatedly crossed the line of neutrality to help union organizers in Kansas. Here, activists protest against Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz in New York City last month. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

After years of carrying medical debt from the premature birth of her daughter, Terri Logan recently discovered a nonprofit called RIP Medical Debt had paid off her bills. Juan Diego Reyes for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for KHN and NPR

This group's wiped out $6.7 billion in medical debt, and it's just getting started

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A new poll finds white adults are more than twice as likely as others to get sizable financial help from parents or grandparents. By contrast, Black adults are more likely to give money to elders. Tracy J. Lee for NPR hide caption

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Tracy J. Lee for NPR

Here's one reason why America's racial wealth gap persists across generations

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Nikki Cox faced possible eviction this summer after her work hours were cut, and then she lost three weeks of pay after getting COVID-19. Via Nikki Cox hide caption

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Via Nikki Cox

'We have nowhere to go': Many face eviction during a crisis in affordable housing

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White adults receive the most financial help from older relatives, poll shows

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Heat advisories have been issued throughout central Texas this week. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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How to get your finances ready for a possible recession

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Homeownership feels out of reach for many Americans. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

As interest rates rise, the 'American dream' of homeownership fades for some

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Housing activists in Swampscott, Mass., on Oct. 14, 2020. A congressional report finds that four corporate landlords acted aggressively to push out tenants during the first year of the pandemic, despite a federal eviction moratorium and billions in emergency rental aid. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Corporate landlords used aggressive tactics to push out more tenants than was known

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What you need to know about preparing financially for a baby

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Tesla has pulled back from its $1.5 billion investment in Bitcoin, which it announced in early 2021. Here, a Bitcoin ATM is seen last year inside a New York City store. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Contractors work on the roof of a house under construction in Louisville, Ky. A new study shows the U.S. is 3.8 million homes short of meeting housing needs. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

There's a massive housing shortage across the U.S. Here's how bad it is where you live

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