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Indicators-giving! How Much Does Thanksgiving Cost This Year?

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Ticket scalpers: The real ticket masters

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Jeromonomics 2.0

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HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra says doctors who are balking at the rules of the No Surprises Act aren't looking out for patients. "I don't think when someone is overcharging that it's going to hurt the overcharger to now have to [accept] a fair price," Becerra says. The Congressional Budget Office estimates the Biden team's rules would push insurance premiums down by 0.5% to 1%. Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Lauren Barber stands in her home in Columbus, Ohio, on Nov. 16. Barber has been inundated with offers from investors and companies that want to buy her house. She sometimes gets called or texted more than five times a day with offers. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Hey, I want to buy your house: Homeowners besieged by unsolicited offers

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An exuberant bid for the Constitution

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Buy now, pay later and online returns are just a couple of the hidden costs of holiday shopping. the_burtons/Getty Images hide caption

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The hidden costs of holiday consumerism

A lot of consumers are worried about supply chain delays this holiday season — but there are also other issues to watch out for when shopping. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe talks about the hidden costs of holiday consumption with The Atlantic staff writer Amanda Mull and The Washington Post retail reporter Abha Bhattarai. They discuss the potential downfalls of buy now, pay later services and where online shopping returns really go. Then, they play a game of Who Said That?

The hidden costs of holiday consumerism

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Should Americans buy less stuff?

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Some doctors, medical associations and members of Congress are complaining that the rule released by the Biden administration this fall for implementing the law to stop surprise medical bills actually favors insurers and doesn't follow the spirit of the legislation. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Toyota Camry, supply-chain hero

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Charities have always accepted cash and coins. Now, they're giving cash directly to help people in need. jsmith/Getty Images hide caption

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Three reasons more charities are giving people cash (And one reason not to).

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High gas prices are posted at a gas station in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Nov. 7. Gas prices are surging across the country yet there's effectively little the Biden administration can do. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Gasoline prices are surging. Can Biden actually do something about it?

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Indicators of the Week: Broadband, bonds, and break-ups

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Housing advocates pushing for stronger evictions protections in New York in August, the same month the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a federal eviction moratorium from the CDC. In the wake of that decision, evictions are now rising in parts of the country that don't have any local protections. Brittainy Newman/AP hide caption

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Evictions rising even as rental help from Congress reaches millions of people

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Medicare Advantage health plans have enrolled nearly 27 million members, or about 45% of people eligible for Medicare. A recent analysis finds Medicare overpaid the private health plans by more than $106 billion from 2010 through 2019 because of the way the plans charge for sicker patients. Innocenti/Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

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The Money Illusion: Have Americans really gotten a raise?

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Global food, local sauces

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