Your Health News and commentary about personal health, medicine, healthcare, drugs, diet, recipes, and nutrition. Download the Your Health podcast and subscribe to our RSS feed.

Your Health

Sol Cotti for NPR

How to decide if freezing your eggs is right for you — and how to get started

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1056834875/1057311949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(from left) Kevin Dedner founded Hurdle, a mental health startup that pairs patients with therapists. Ashlee Wisdom's company, Health in Her Hue, connects women of color with culturally sensitive medical providers. Nathan Pelzer's Clinify Health analyzes data to help doctors identify at-risk patients in underserved areas. Erica Plybeah's firm, MedHaul, arranges transport to medical appointments. Kevin Dedner; Kolin Mendez Photography; Aaron Gang Photography; Starboard & Port Creative hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Dedner; Kolin Mendez Photography; Aaron Gang Photography; Starboard & Port Creative

Vezna Hang and his son. Hang fell so ill with COVID-19 before being vaccinated that he needed a double lung transplant. He now encourages other people to get the shot. Vezna Hang hide caption

toggle caption
Vezna Hang

Once rare, lung transplants for COVID-19 patients are rising quickly

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1058988220/1059600397" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Three generations, (from left to right) grandmother Genoveva Calloway, daughter Petra Gonzales, and granddaughter Vanesa Quintero, live next door to each other in San Pablo, Calif. Recently their extended family was hit with a second wave of COVID infections a year after the first. Beth LaBerge/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Beth LaBerge/KQED

COVID hit 13 members of their family the first time. A year later it struck again

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1058128612/1059118357" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

James Bond (Daniel Craig) and Dr. Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux) drive through Matera, Italy in No Time To Die. A scientific review of Bond's decades of international adventures concludes that the famous secret agent has consistently neglected critical travel health precautions. Nicola Dove/DANJAQ, LLC AND MGM hide caption

toggle caption
Nicola Dove/DANJAQ, LLC AND MGM

Booster shots are authorized for all U.S. adults, but some are wondering if they need them. A nurse fills a syringe with a Pfizer-BioNTech dose at a pop-up vaccine clinic in the Arleta neighborhood of Los Angeles. Robyn Beck /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck /AFP via Getty Images

Community clinics say the easing of restrictions on telehealth during the pandemic has made it possible for health workers to connect with hard-to-reach patients via a phone call — people who are poor, elderly or live in remote areas, and don't have access to a computer or cellphone with video capability. Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images

Voice-only telehealth may go away with pandemic rules expiring

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1056612250/1058624404" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

TK splatchcock turkey Derek Campanile / Dad With A Pan hide caption

toggle caption
Derek Campanile / Dad With A Pan

This Thanksgiving, let science help you roast a tastier turkey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1057549040/1057580680" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Safeway pharmacist Shahrzad Khoobyari administers a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot into the arm of Norman Solomon in San Rafael, Calif., in October. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Jason Dean received six stitches and a tetanus shot after he cut his knee in May. In August, his wife, DeeAnn, feared going to the same emergency room where he was treated, delaying her diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Blake Farmer/WPLN News hide caption

toggle caption
Blake Farmer/WPLN News

The ER charged him $6,589.77 for 6 stitches, a cost that led his wife to avoid the ER

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1056866145/1060185971" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
RLT_Images/Getty Images

Coronavirus FAQ: What is long COVID? And what is my risk of getting it?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1055071699/1055807816" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

LiceDoctors technician Linda Holmes checks the heads of everyone in the Marker family for lice, including preschooler Hudson. It cost more than $200 to get the four-person household checked — eyebrows and Dad's beard included. Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN

A nurse administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a nine-year-old child in Tustin, CA. Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Parents, We're Here To Help! Answers To Your COVID Vaccine Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1055951181/1055997990" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Eugene Mymrin/Getty Images

New clues to the biology of long COVID are starting to emerge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1053509795/1056761978" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Mar Hernández for NPR

A woman receives a Pfizer vaccination booster shot from a nurse in Los Angeles. California Department of Public Health officials say that no fully vaccinated adult should be denied a COVID-19 booster shot in the state. Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

A federal bankruptcy judge in North Carolina has temporarily halt roughly 38,000 lawsuits against Johnson & Johnson that claim the company's baby powder was contaminated with cancer-causing asbestos. AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images