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Ivan Fedorov (third from left), then first deputy head of the Zaporizhzhia Regional State Administration, attends a meeting on road repairs in southeastern Ukraine in 2020. Fedorov, now the mayor of Melitopol, was abducted by Russian forces earlier this month and later freed. Dmytro Smolyenko/Future Publishing via Getty Images hide caption

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Dmytro Smolyenko/Future Publishing via Getty Images

The UN says it needs a record-breaking $4.4 billion to help Afghanistan

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What Kyiv looks like as Russian troops appear to reposition

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An Australian journalist detained in China goes on trial

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Daddy Yankee, a reggaeton 'leyenda,' retires

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Aleksii Simchenko welds together pieces of scrap steel to make a set of plates for body armor. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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In Ukraine, volunteers are making body armor from old cars

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Tugboats pull on the Ever Forward near Pasadena, Md., on Tuesday, trying to free the ship as it sits in the Chesapeake Bay after running aground near Baltimore. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ukraine is inventing a new way to fight on the digital battlefield

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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy addresses the U.S. Congress on March 16, 2022, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. Since the war began, he has been appealing to world leaders for more support for Ukraine and sanctions on Russia. J. Scott Applewhite/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angelina Voychenko (left) and her children and Yuliya Bortnik (right) and her son fled Mariupol after hiding for weeks in the basement of Voychenko's parents' home, with no electricity, phone service or heat, as the building shook from fighter jets and explosions. When they emerged to buy food, what they saw made them decide to leave: destroyed buildings, looted stores, no food in sight. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Ukrainians navigate a perilous route to safety out of besieged Mariupol

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Australian Ambassador to China Graham Fletcher, left, is turned away by court officials and police as he tried to enter the trial of Chinese Australian journalist Cheng Lei at the Beijing Number 2 Intermediate People's Court on Thursday in Beijing. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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