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The U.S.-operated GPS has falsely located planes, people and ships, sometimes placing them at the Beirut's international airport. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Israel fakes GPS locations to deter attacks, but it also throws off planes and ships

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Ask Dalí at the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Fla., allows visitors talk to the famous surrealist artist via an AI-generated version of his voice. Martin Pagh Ludvigsen/Goodby Silverstein & Partners hide caption

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Martin Pagh Ludvigsen/Goodby Silverstein & Partners

Andrew Song and Luke Iseman of Make Sunsets ready for a launch. Iseman says they hope to someday cool the earth on a larger scale. Julia Simon/NPR hide caption

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Julia Simon/NPR

Google has a contract with the Israeli government where it provides the country with cloud computing services. Not all Google employees are happy about that. Alexander Koerner/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Koerner/Getty Images

Google worker says the company is 'silencing our voices' after dozens are fired

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An Instagram page where the user has hidden their entire photo grid. The trend is being led by younger members increasingly concerned for their privacy. NPR hide caption

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Author Cristina Henriquez next to the cover of her new novel, The Great Divide. Brian McConkey/Ecco hide caption

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Brian McConkey/Ecco

Kenton Smith designs circuit boards and has long been fascinated by computers. He was examining chips a few years ago when he found one smiling back up at him. Courtesy of Kenton Smith hide caption

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Courtesy of Kenton Smith

A billboard in central Tehran, Iran, depicts named Iranian ballistic missiles in service, with text in Arabic reading "the honest [person's] promise" and text in Persian reading "Israel is weaker than a spider's web," on April 15. Iran attacked Israel over the weekend with missiles, which it said was a response to a deadly strike on its consulate building in Damascus, Syria. Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images

Kitboga, a popular "scam baiter" who hides behind characters to waste the time of scammers, has a combined Twitch and YouTube following of more than million subscribers. His aviator sunglasses — a signature look — recall a comically disguised CIA agent. Kitboga on Twitch/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Kitboga on Twitch/Screenshot by NPR

President Biden tours a Samsung plant in Pyeongtaek, South Korea with South Korean President Yoon Suk-youl on May 20, 2022. The company is building a massive new campus in Texas. Kim Min-Hee/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Min-Hee/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Some California users of Google were not able to access local news on Friday after the tech giant restricted news links in the state in response to a bill that would force the tech giant to pay publishers. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Posters of some of those kidnapped by Hamas in Israel are displayed on a pole in Manhattan. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Most doxxing campaigns only last a few days. But the effects can be felt for months

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A 2014 file photo of the seal of the Federal Trade Commission in a carpet a FTC headquarters in Washington, DC. The organization is trying to raise consumer awareness about the use of artificial intelligence tools to create convincing audio deepfakes. Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images

A new lunar time zone has been pitched for the moon. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

NASA has been asked to create a time zone for the moon. Here's how it would work

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The Apple Pay app on an iPhone in New York. Consumers tend to spend about 10% more when they adopt mobile contactless payment methods, a researcher says. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Using your phone to pay is convenient, but it can also mean you spend more

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