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Jack Dorsey is stepping down as the CEO of Twitter, which he co-founded. Here he's shown at a bitcoin convention in June. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Jack Dorsey steps down as Twitter CEO; Parag Agrawal succeeds him

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Elizabeth Holmes walks into federal court in San Jose, Calif., on Monday. Holmes is accused of duping elite financial backers, customers and patients into believing that her startup was about to revolutionize medicine. Nic Coury/AP hide caption

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Nic Coury/AP

Ex-Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes takes the witness stand in her fraud trial

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Community clinics say the easing of restrictions on telehealth during the pandemic has made it possible for health workers to connect with hard-to-reach patients via a phone call — people who are poor, elderly or live in remote areas, and don't have access to a computer or cellphone with video capability. Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images

Voice-only telehealth may go away with pandemic rules expiring

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The Duck Valley Indian Reservation is home to the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and comprises about 450 square miles along the Idaho/Nevada border. Only one power line goes into it, shown here along Highway 51. Kyle Green for NPR hide caption

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Kyle Green for NPR

Life without reliable internet remains a daily struggle for millions of Americans

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Web3, short for web 3.0, is a vision of the future of the Internet in which people operate on decentralized, quasi-anonymous platforms, rather than depend on tech giants like Google, Facebook and Twitter. Ani_Ka/Getty Images hide caption

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Ani_Ka/Getty Images

People are talking about Web3. Is it the Internet of the future or just a buzzword?

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Tesla drivers can unlock and start their vehicle from the smart phones, which became problematic when the app refused to work Friday. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images) Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Buy now, pay later and online returns are just a couple of the hidden costs of holiday shopping. the_burtons/Getty Images hide caption

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the_burtons/Getty Images

The hidden costs of holiday consumerism

A lot of consumers are worried about supply chain delays this holiday season — but there are also other issues to watch out for when shopping. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe talks about the hidden costs of holiday consumption with The Atlantic staff writer Amanda Mull and The Washington Post retail reporter Abha Bhattarai. They discuss the potential downfalls of buy now, pay later services and where online shopping returns really go. Then, they play a game of Who Said That?

The hidden costs of holiday consumerism

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Sea levels in Guyana are rising several times faster than the global average. High tides sometimes spill over the seawall that is meant to protect the coastline. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Two Sides Of Guyana: A Green Champion And An Oil Producer

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Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg envisions a future where people work and play in virtual reality in an online space called the metaverse. Facebook hide caption

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Facebook

The metaverse is already here. The debate now is over who should own it

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People shop at the Fifth Avenue Apple Store in September in New York City. Apple says customers who want to repair their own devices will be able to buy the parts and tools to do so for certain products starting early next year. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Climate Pledge Arena in Seattle asks fans to prove their vaccination status with the CLEAR Health Pass app Martin Kaste/Martin Kaste hide caption

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Martin Kaste/Martin Kaste

There's an app to help prove vax status, but experts say choose wisely

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Internet access has always been a problem for Faylene Begay, a single mother of four living on the Navajo reservation in Arizona. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Students are still struggling to get internet. The infrastructure law could help

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Delegates attend the COP26 UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, Scotland Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images

These researchers are trying to stop misinformation from derailing climate progress

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