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A controversial new drug for ALS that just received FDA approval could add months to patients' lives, but some scientists question whether it actually works. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

ALS drug's approval draws cheers from patients, questions from skeptics

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Raffiella Chapman stars as Vesper, a 13-year-old bio-hacker. Courtesy of IFC Films hide caption

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Courtesy of IFC Films

In a bio-engineered dystopia, 'Vesper' finds seeds of hope

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A diver in the Revillagigedo Archipelago interacts with giant mantas as part of a citizen science cruise led by Dr. Alfredo Giron. Alfredo Giron hide caption

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Alfredo Giron

Hurricane Ian left debris in Punta Gorda, Fla., after it made landfall. Storms like Ian are more likely because of climate change. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images

Climate change makes storms like Ian more common

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Illustration of an overactive bladder, a condition where there is a frequent feeling of needing to urinate, sometimes with loss of bladder control leading to urge incontinence. KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty Images hide caption

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KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty Images

Why The Bladder Is Number One!

When's the last time you thought about your bladder? We're going there today! In this Short Wave episode, Emily talks to bladder expert Dr. Indira Mysorekar about one of our stretchiest organs: how it can expand so much, the potential culprit behind recurrent urinary tract infections and the still-somewhat-mysterious link between the aging brain and the aging bladder.

Why The Bladder Is Number One!

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A drug based on LSD appears to treat depression in mice without the psychedelic trip

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Few large grasslands remain intact. Though they play a huge role in limiting the effects of climate change, they are threatened and tend to have few protections. Tracy Kessner hide caption

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Tracy Kessner

Families gather in a playground with a splash pad and swings in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park. Philadelphia has multiple projects underway to make this and other large parks in the city more resilient to heat and other effects of climate change. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

NASA spacecraft's asteroid crash offers insight in case one ever threatens Earth

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This illustration shows the DART spacecraft approaching the two asteroids, Didymos and Dimorphos, with a small observing spacecraft nearby. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben hide caption

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Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

The Library of Congress has acquired the life's work of radio producer Jim Metzner, who has spent decades traveling the world to capture rich soundscapes. While he's honored that they will be archived, he says he wants to make sure people actually listen to them. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

He spent decades recording soundscapes. Now they're going to the Library of Congress

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Asteroid Didymos and its moonlet Dimorphos are not a threat to Earth, but because they do pass relatively close to Earth, so they were chosen as the target for NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test mission. The redirect technology could one day be used to deflect asteroids on a collision course with our home planet. NASA JPL DART Navigation Team hide caption

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NASA JPL DART Navigation Team

Asteroid Deflection Mission, Activate!

In movies, asteroids careening towards Earth are confronted by determined humans with nuclear weapons to save the world! But a real NASA mission wants to change the course of an asteroid now (one not hurtling towards Earth). The Double Asteroid Redirection Test, or DART, launched in 2021 and on Monday, September 26, 2022, makes contact with the celestial object. In 2021, NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce talked about what it takes to pull off this mission and how it could potentially protect the Earth in the future from killer space rocks, and that's what you'll hear today. And stay tuned - when NASA has the results of contact in a few weeks, Short Wave will bring Nell back to tell us all about it!

Asteroid Deflection Mission, Activate!

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A view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and turbulent southern hemisphere was captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft in 2019. NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill