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Q&A: What's Different About The Delta Variant

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Democratic Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly's legal battle with the Republican-led Legislature has left confusion over whether she has the authority to issue new pandemic restrictions. Kelly did not issue a mask mandate when speaking Wednesday from the state Capitol in Topeka. Abigail Censky/KCUR hide caption

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Abigail Censky/KCUR
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Why Sweat Is A Human Superpower

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Thousands of dancing fireflies in Japan create an enchanted forest. Photographer Kei Nomiyama has visited the Japanese island Shikoku every year since 2012 to capture the mesmerizing images of thousands of fireflies glowing in the forest. Kei Nomiyama/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Kei Nomiyama/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

New Study Links Rate Of Emissions To Extreme Weather

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The remains of a burned home are seen in the Indian Falls neighborhood of unincorporated Plumas County, California on July 26, 2021. Extreme weather events have claimed hundreds of lives worldwide in recent weeks, and upcoming forecasts for wildfire and hurricane seasons are dire. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

A wind farm in Wyoming generates electricity for a region that used to be more dependent on coal-fired power plants. A new study finds that millions of lives could be saved this century by rapidly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Matt Young/AP hide caption

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Matt Young/AP

Students wearing masks listen to teacher Dorene Scala during third grade summer school at Hooper Avenue School in Los Angeles, California. Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Ron Goode and Ray Gutteriez keep an eye on a burning sourberry bush. After the bushes are burned in the winter, they sprout again in the spring. Lauren Sommer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/NPR

A female Anopheles mosquito, a common vector for malaria, feeds on human skin. In a landmark study, researchers showed that genetically modified Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes could crash their own species in an environment mimicking sub-Saharan Africa, where the malaria-carrying mosquitoes spread. Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons

How An Altered Strand Of DNA Can Cause Malaria-Spreading Mosquitoes To Self-Destruct

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Tanzania's President Samia Suluhu Hassan receives her Johnson & Johnson vaccine against the coronavirus at the statehouse in Dar es Salaam on July 28. Her administration has reversed the government's anti-vaccination stance. Emmanuel Herman/Reuters hide caption

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Emmanuel Herman/Reuters

Map showing simulated floodwaters near Google's Sunnyvale campus. ESRI; NPR hide caption

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ESRI; NPR

Who Pays When Sea Levels Rise?

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