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NASA astronauts (from left) Bob Behnken, Doug Hurley and Chris Cassidy are the U.S. members of the Expedition 63 crew aboard the International Space Station. Behnken and Hurley are scheduled to return to Earth on Aug. 2. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Andrew Stuart wears a bandana as a mask while taking a selfie with his dog, Voltron, on Sunset Blvd, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in West Hollywood, Calif. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

Coronavirus Questions Answered, Plus A Chat About 'Indian Matchmaking'

Should I wear a mask while running? How often should I wipe down my phone? Can I say hello to other people's dogs? Our listeners had questions about coronavirus, we have answers. Sam is joined by Short Wave host Maddie Sofia to dig into the science behind some of the decisions we have to make about everyday encounters in this pandemic. Then, Sam is all caught up in the buzz around Netflix's Indian Matchmaking, and he calls up journalist and former It's Been a Minute intern Hafsa Fathima to break it down.

Coronavirus Questions Answered, Plus A Chat About 'Indian Matchmaking'

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Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence To Study Elephant Calls

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New Study Finds Expanded Jobless Benefits Don't Reduce Employment

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Director of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Francis Collins, holds a model of the coronavirus. This is the sixth vaccine candidate to join Operation Warp Speed's portfolio, and the largest vaccine deal to date. Saul Loeb/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

A man runs with his dog while at Brooklyn Bridge Park. If you're greeting other doggos, do it from a distance. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Coronavirus Q&A: Running Outside, Petting Dogs, And More

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A healthcare worker zips up a protective barrier in the Covid-19 Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston on July 2. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Has Lost Control Of The Coronavirus. What Now?

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A scientist is pictured working during a visit by Britain's Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (unseen), to Oxford Vaccine Group's laboratory facility at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford, west of London on June 24, 2020, on his visit to learn more about the group's work to establish a viable vaccine against coronavirus COVID-19. STEVE PARSONS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STEVE PARSONS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Air pollution is a persistent problem in California's Central Valley. A new study finds that the places that were most polluted nearly 40 years ago generally remain the most polluted today. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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On the left is an unmodified hatchling of a longfin inshore squid (Doryteuthis pealeii). The one on the right was injected with CRISPR-Cas9 targeting a pigmentation gene before the first cell division. It has very few pigmented cells and lighter eyes. Karen Crawford hide caption

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Karen Crawford

The 1st Gene-Altered Squid Has Thrilled Biologists

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Lillian Kay Petersen, 17, from Los Alamos, N.M., won first place in the 2020 Regeneron Science Talent Search, a science and math competition for high school seniors. The pandemic meant a virtual Zoom ceremony rather than what's usually a black-tie gala ceremony in the nation's capital. Society for Science screenshot hide caption

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High School Senior's Tool To End Food Insecurity Wins National Competition

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Monarch butterflies, like this one in Temascaltepec, Mexico, use ultraviolet polarized light to help them navigate in flight. Omar Torres/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Torres/AFP via Getty Images

Butterflies Have Hearts In Their Wings. You'll Never Guess Where They Have Eyes

Adriana Briscoe, a professor of biology and ecology at UC Irvine, studies vision in butterflies. As part of her research, she's trained them to detect light of a certain color. She also explains why they bask in the sunlight, and why some of them have 'hearts' in their wings.

Butterflies Have Hearts In Their Wings. You'll Never Guess Where They Have Eyes

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Apple CEO Tim Cook are sworn-in before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law. MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

In The Pandemic, Big Tech Is Bigger Than Ever. Should Consumers Be Worried?

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Blood plasma — the yellowish, cell-free portion that remains after red and white blood cells have been filtered out by a machine and returned to the plasma donor — is rich with antibodies. Plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients might prove useful in preventing infection as well as in treatment, scientists say. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

Harvested Antibodies Now Being Tested As A Prevention Tool Against COVID-19

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