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The U.S. Justice Department filed a brief in federal appeals court Tuesday to overturn a federal judge's decision that declared the government mask mandate on planes, trains and buses unlawful. Here, a sign stating that masks are required at San Francisco International Airport stands in a terminal after the federal mask mandate was overturned. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The green boxes show portions of the audio spectrogram that artificial intelligence has identified as marine mammal calls. Ocean Science Analytics hide caption

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Ocean Science Analytics

A computer program designed to sort mice squeaks is also finding whales in the deep

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A bounty of black holes surround the Sagittarius A supermassive black hole which lies at the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. NASA/CXC/Columbia Univ./C. Hailey et al. hide caption

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NASA/CXC/Columbia Univ./C. Hailey et al.

What does a black hole sound like? NASA has an answer

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Scientists have discovered that a drug used to treat HIV helps restore a particular kind of memory loss in mice. The results hold promise for humans, too. ROBERT F. BUKATY/AP hide caption

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ROBERT F. BUKATY/AP

A drug for HIV appears to reverse a type of memory loss in mice

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Black or brown hydrogen is extracted from coal. Gray hydrogen is made by heating natural gas. Both create carbon dioxide. Blue hydrogen captures about 90% of that carbon dioxide and stores it, usually underground. Green hydrogen uses renewable energy to split hydrogen out of water using electricity. Pink hydrogen does the same but relies on nuclear power. Meredith Miotke for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

Hydrogen may be a climate solution. There's debate over how clean it will truly be

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Kenyan mountaineer James Kagambi (C), 62, is welcomed upon his arrival as the first Kenyan who reached the summit of Mount Everest, the world's highest peak of 8,849 meters, at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya, on May 23, 2022. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images

James Kagambi: The 62 Year Old Who Just Summited Everest

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Encore: The United States' only native parrot is being studied, to save it

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Demonstrators attend a candlelight vigil Wednesday in Fairfax, Va., for the victims of the Uvalde and Buffalo mass shootings. Allison Bailey/Reuters Connect hide caption

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Allison Bailey/Reuters Connect

Research shows policies that may help prevent mass shootings — and some that don't

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Green the Chow Chow sits in the grooming area at the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at The Piers on February 12, 2018 in New York City. The show is scheduled to see 2,882 dogs from all 50 states take part in this year's competition. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dog Breeds Are A Behavioral Myth... Sorry!

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An HIV drug appears to boost memory in mice, study shows

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ATLANTA, GA - MAY 21: People hold signs during a protest against recently passed abortion ban bills at the Georgia State Capitol building, on May 21, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Georgia "heartbeat" bill would ban abortion when a fetal heartbeat is detected. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images) Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

How Changes in Abortion Law Could Impact Community Health

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The shapes in this salt crystal are consistent with what would be expected for microorganisms. Kathy Benison hide caption

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Kathy Benison

This 830-million-year-old crystal might contain life. And we're about to open it

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