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Scientist Joyce Poole On What Elephants Have To Say

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More than 30 states have medical marijuana programs — yet scientists are only allowed to use cannabis plants from one U.S. source for their research. That's set to change, as the federal government begins to add more growers to the mix. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A young, red-handed tamarin monkey. Some of these monkeys are changing their vocal call to better communicate with another species of tamarin. Schellhorn/ullstein bild/Getty Images hide caption

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Schellhorn/ullstein bild/Getty Images

Scientists Say These Monkeys Use An 'Accent' To Communicate With Their Foe

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Supporters of the Asian-American community attended a rally in late March against anti-Asian violence Queens in New York. Emaz/VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Emaz/VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images

Professor with muscular dystrophy working with engineering students setting up adjustable stage at chemical analysis instrument in a laboratory Huntstock/Getty Images/DisabilityImages hide caption

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Huntstock/Getty Images/DisabilityImages

Disabled Scientists Are Often Excluded From The Lab

Scientists and students with disabilities are often excluded from laboratories — in part because of how they're designed. Emily Kwong speaks to disabled scientist Krystal Vasquez on how her disability changed her relationship to science, how scientific research can become more accessible, and how STEMM fields need to change to be more welcoming to disabled scientists.

Disabled Scientists Are Often Excluded From The Lab

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Good Beer Doesn't Just Taste Better, It Sounds Better Too

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Bipartisan Bill Would Pour Billions Into Science And Technology To Compete With China

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The vaccines for COVID-19 are highly effective, but people can get infected in what appear to be extremely rare cases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has decided only to investigate the cases that result in hospitalization or death. Image Point FR/NIH/NIAID/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Image Point FR/NIH/NIAID/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

CDC Move To Limit Investigations Into COVID Breakthrough Infections Sparks Concerns

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A laboratory on the campus of the Wuhan Institute of Virology in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province in May 2020. Focus has turned back to the facility as a possible origin of the coronavirus pandemic. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

Why The U.S. Thinks A Lab In Wuhan Needs A Closer Look As A Possible Pandemic Source

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Scientists expect increasing marine heat waves to cause coral bleaching, which can result in reefs dying off. Kevin Lino/NOAA/NMFS/PIFSC/ESD hide caption

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Kevin Lino/NOAA/NMFS/PIFSC/ESD

Fearing Their Kids Will Inherit Dead Coral Reefs, Scientists Are Urging Bold Action

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A tobacco store advertises and sells Juul tobacco products in midtown Manhattan. Andrew Lichtenstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Getty Images

Big Vape: The Incendiary Rise of Juul E-cigarettes

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Firefighters battle a brush fire last week in Santa Barbara, Calif. Climate-driven droughts make large, destructive fires more likely around the world. Scientists warn that humans are on track to cause catastrophic global warming this century. Santa Barbara County, Calif., Fire Department via AP hide caption

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Santa Barbara County, Calif., Fire Department via AP

Learning How To Smell Again After COVID-19

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