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What Happened Today: New Model Projections, Coronavirus Task Force Speaks

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Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), speaks during a news conference in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, March 10th, 2020. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A scientist works in a lab at Moderna in Cambridge, Mass., in February. Moderna has developed an experimental coronavirus medicine, but an approved treatment could be more than a year away. David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images

A spokesperson for St. Barnabas Hospital said Monday that it takes four to six days for the hospital to receive coronavirus test results. Misha Friedman/Getty Images hide caption

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Misha Friedman/Getty Images

New York City Hospitals Struggle To Get Virus Testing Online Amid Patient Surge

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This cube of uranium metal came from a reactor that the Nazis tried to build during World War II. Hundreds of others like it are now missing. John T. Consoli/University of Maryland hide caption

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John T. Consoli/University of Maryland

Aetna was the first insurer to announce its plan to help shield patients with COVID-19 from high medical bills. But out-of-network charges and other surprise bills remain a risk, say advocates for patients. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Trump listens to Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases during the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on Sunday. At the same briefing, Trump announced extended social distancing guidelines in effect until April 30. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Social Distancing Extended; Grocery Store Tips

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The Food and Drug Administration has authorized two malaria drugs — chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine — to be added to the national emergency stockpile for use in responding to COVID-19. Photo Illustration by John Phillips/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by John Phillips/Getty Images

The logo of the World Health Organization (WHO) at its headquarters in Geneva. The organization says the coronavirus is primarily transmitted "through respiratory droplets and contact routes," not airborne transmission. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

World Health Organization Antimicrobial Expert Explains Transmission Of Coronavirus

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Coronavirus Updates: Social Distancing Guidelines Extended, Washington State News

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CDC Director Redfield Speaks On U.S. Readiness And Latest Guidance For Coronavirus

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With Strict Social Distancing, U.S. COVID-19 Deaths May Total 100,000

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