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Scientist Corey Gray and his mother, Sharon Yellowfly, are pictured at one of the two massive detectors that make up the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory. One facility, where Gray works, is in Washington state, and the other is in Louisiana. Courtesy of Russell Barber hide caption

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Courtesy of Russell Barber

How A Cosmic Collision Sparked A Native American Translator's Labor Of Love

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Smog fills Utah's Salt Lake Valley in January 2017. Winter weather in the area often traps air pollution that is bad for public health. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

EPA Science Panel Considering Guidelines That Upend Basic Air Pollution Science

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The sea squirt Ascidia sydneiensis, a tubelike animal that squirts water out of its body when alarmed, is one of 48 additional nonnative marine species in the Galapagos Islands documented in a newly published study. Previously, researchers knew of only five. Courtesy of Jim Carlton hide caption

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Courtesy of Jim Carlton

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

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Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us

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Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do, by Jennifer Eberhardt Viking hide caption

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Viking

Can We Overcome Racial Bias? 'Biased' Author Says To Start By Acknowledging It

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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A female adult head louse holds onto human hairs, as it is filmed under a microscope. The brown line visible inside the louse, on the left side of its body, is the blood meal it took when it lived on a human host's scalp. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

LED lightbulbs have replaced many incandescent ones. Now, the Trump administration wants to reverse an Obama-era rule designed to make a wide array of other lightbulbs more efficient. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Trump Administration Dims Rule On Energy Efficient Lightbulbs

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In March of 2017, the two sets of Bogotá twins, Jorge, William, Carlos and Wilber (left to right), gathered to celebrate Carlos's graduation. Diana Carolina/St. Martin's Press hide caption

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Diana Carolina/St. Martin's Press

Duke University is paying the U.S. $112.5 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by submitting falsified research data to win or keep federal grants. Here, a photo shows the Duke University Hospital in Durham, N.C., in 2008, when some of the fraud was alleged to have taken place. Chris Keane/Reuters hide caption

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Chris Keane/Reuters

German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst took this image of the Earth reflecting light from the sun while aboard the International Space Station July 17, 2014. Alexander Gerst/ESA/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Gerst/ESA/Getty Images