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After a dose of ketamine, special video games that offered a depressed player positive feedback, in the form of smiling faces or encouraging words, seemed to boost the length of time the drug quelled depression. akinbostanci/Getty Images hide caption

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akinbostanci/Getty Images

Smiling faces might help the drug ketamine keep depression at bay

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Platen Heilmethode 1894. Grafissimo/Getty Images hide caption

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Grafissimo/Getty Images

William Simpson with a 2-year-old Appaloosa colt near the Soda Mountain Wilderness area, straddling the Oregon and California border, in July 2022. Michelle Gough hide caption

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Michelle Gough

Preventing wildfire with the Wild Horse Fire Brigade

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A recent study found that adding strangers to the mix of people we speak with might increase our happiness. Gpointstudio/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Gpointstudio/Getty Images/Image Source

Talking to strangers might make you happier, a study on 'relational diversity' finds

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There have been a few long term studies of the box turtle that looked at box turtle populations over several decades. The studies showed big population declines—75 percent or more. Nell Greenfieldboyce/NPR hide caption

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Nell Greenfieldboyce/NPR

100 Years Of Box Turtles

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A Scarlet Tanager perches on a branch. In the Neversink Mounatin Preserve in Lower Alsace Township Tuesday afternoon June 22, 2021. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Abortion is on the ballot in Montana. Voters will decide fate of the 'Born Alive' law

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The International Space Station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour on Nov. 8, 2021. On Monday, the ISS had to fire its thrusters to avoid space junk. NASA Johnson Space Center via Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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NASA Johnson Space Center via Flickr Creative Commons

The civil war in Ethiopia is destroying the medical system in the northern region of Tigray. Iman Raza Khan/Getty Images hide caption

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Iman Raza Khan/Getty Images

An electron microscope image shows a SARS-CoV-2 particle isolated in the early days of the pandemic. It's been nearly a year since omicron was first detected, and scientists say this branch of the coronavirus family tree is still thriving. NIAID/NIH via AP hide caption

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NIAID/NIH via AP

Omicron keeps finding new evolutionary tricks to outsmart our immunity

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Baker Lake is surrounded by Fall colors on October 8, 2022 near East Bolton, Quebec, Canada. SEBASTIEN ST-JEAN / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SEBASTIEN ST-JEAN / AFP via Getty Images

When Autumn Leaves Start To Fall

Botanist and founder of #BlackBotanistsWeek Tanisha Williams explains why some leaves change color during fall and what shorter days and colder temperatures have to do with it. Plus, a bit of listener mail from you! (Encore)

When Autumn Leaves Start To Fall

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Unwanted used plastic sits outside Garten Services, a recycling facility in Oregon. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

Recycling plastic is practically impossible — and the problem is getting worse

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Researchers have found a link between chemical straighteners and uterine cancer

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