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The FDA review of Moderna's application for an emergency use authorization of its coronavirus vaccine in adolescents may not be completed before January, the company said. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Female California condors reproduce without males for the first time

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The northern lights can be seen from the Cameron River viewpoint off the Ramparts Falls trail on the Ingraham Trail near Yellowknife, Canada. VWPics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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VWPics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Maria Laura Rojas, a climate activist from Bogota, at the outskirts of the city. Erika Piñeros for NPR hide caption

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Erika Piñeros for NPR

From a place of privilege, she speaks the truth about climate to power

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Ari Blank got a comforting hand-squeeze from his mom in May as he was vaccinated against COVID-19 in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. This week, the Food and Drug Administration authorized the use of Pfizer's vaccine in even younger kids — ages 5 to 11. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images
Hanna Barczyk for NPR

COVID's endgame: Scientists have a clue about where SARS-CoV-2 is headed

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Massive icebergs from Jakobshavn Glacier melting in Disko Bay on sunny summer evening, Ilulissat, Greenland. Paul Souders/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Souders/Getty Images

Should I have kids? Move? Recycle? Your climate questions answered

Ahead of the U.N. climate talks in Glasgow this weekend, Sam chats with climate experts Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, marine biologist and writer, and Kendra Pierre-Louis, senior climate reporter with the podcast 'How to Save a Planet.' Together, they answer listener questions about everything from how to talk to your kids about global warming... to how to deal with all of this existential dread.

Should I have kids? Move? Recycle? Your climate questions answered

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TED Radio Hour: Kathryn A. Whitehead Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED hide caption

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Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED

Kathryn Whitehead: How can we safely deliver vaccines to the right cells?

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TED Radio Hour: Keller Rinaudo Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Keller Rinaudo: How can delivery drones save lives?

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TED Radio Hour: Erika Hamden Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Erika Hamden: What does it take to send a telescope into the stratosphere?

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Climate activists "set fire" to George Square, Glasgow, with an art installation creating a field of climate fire to welcome world leaders to Glasgow for the COP26 conference. Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images

U.S. health officials have changed their definition of lead poisoning in young children — a move expected to more than double the number of kids with worrisome levels of the toxic metal in their blood. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Entrance Gate to Bellevue Hospital in New York City Education Images/Education Images/Universal Image hide caption

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Education Images/Education Images/Universal Image

How metaphors and stories are integral to science and healing

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