Science The latest health and science news. Updates on medicine, healthy living, nutrition, drugs, diet, and advances in science and technology. Subscribe to the Health & Science podcast.

Researchers have observed that the friendliest male bonobos, like this male resident of Lola Ya Bonobo sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, tend to be the most successful. Early humans may have had the same experience with their peers. Ley Uwera for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ley Uwera for NPR

Tony Potts, a 69-year-old retiree living in Ormond Beach, Fla., receives his first injection earlier this year as a participant in a Phase 3 clinical trial of Moderna's COVID-19 candidate vaccine. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NurPhoto via Getty Images

Advisers To CDC Debate How COVID-19 Vaccine Should Be Rolled Out

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/929484340/929726112" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A partially eclipsed super blue blood moon sets behind the Golden Gate Bridge on Jan. 31, 2018, in San Francisco. The "super blue blood moon" is a rare "lunar trifecta" event and was the first such lunar event seen in North America since 1866. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

'Once In A Blue Moon' Is Happening Again This Halloween

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/928046825/929306594" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Learning to ride a bike can lead to memorable tumbles. It's the brain's "time cells," scientists now say, that help organize and seal those experiences in our minds. Peter Cade/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Cade/Getty Images

Why Some Memories Seem Like Movies: 'Time Cells' Discovered In Human Brains

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/929133717/929159604" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A harvester works through a field of corn near Santa Rosa, Calif. This corn has been genetically modified, and contains bacterial genes that kill certain insects, but the genes have become less effective. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

As Biotech Crops Lose Their Power, Scientists Push For New Restrictions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/927111009/931836733" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

During deep sleep, waves of cerebrospinal fluid (blue) coincide with temporary decreases in blood flow (red). Less blood in the brain means more room for the fluid to carry away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. Fultz et al. 2019 hide caption

toggle caption
Fultz et al. 2019

One More Step Toward Solving The Sleep & Alzheimer's Puzzle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/927955827/928380502" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists Find Cells In The Human Brain Responsible For Episodic Memory

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/928805810/928805811" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists Find Massive Coral Reef In Australia's Great Barrier Reef

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/928556256/928556257" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Increasingly, many people in the U.S., like these teens in a Miami grocery story in August, now routinely wear face masks in public to help stop COVID-19's spread. But social distancing and other public health measures have been slower to catch on, especially among young adults, a national survey finds. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A box of Twinkies sat in Colin Purrington's basement for eight years, until just a few weeks ago. Two West Virginia University scientists are studying the fungi growing on them. Matt Kasson hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Kasson

Cars line up Friday at a coronavirus testing site at the University of Texas at El Paso. The area has seen a surge in cases in recent weeks, and a two-week curfew is now in effect in El Paso County. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

On average, each U.S. nursing home is connected to seven others through shared staff, a study by Yale and UCLA researchers suggests. Rigorous infection control measures can curb the spread of the coronavirus, but many workers say they still don't have sufficient masks and other personal protective equipment. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
SDI Productions/Getty Images

They Work In Several Nursing Homes To Eke Out A Living, And That May Spread The Virus

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/927841874/927948398" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Researchers have detected water molecules in Clavius crater, in the moon's southern hemisphere. The large crater is visible from Earth. NASA/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Screenshot by NPR