Science The latest health and science news. Updates on medicine, healthy living, nutrition, drugs, diet, and advances in science and technology. Subscribe to the Health & Science podcast.

An aerial photo taken in April 2020 shows the scenery of a giant karst sinkhole in China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. A similar sinkhole was found earlier this month with an ancient forest at the bottom with trees towering over 100 feet tall. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Rahima Banu, pictured with her mother in Bangladesh in 1975, is recorded as having the last known naturally-occurring case of the deadly form of smallpox. Daniel Tarantola/WHO hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Tarantola/WHO

How Rahima came to hold a special place in smallpox history — and help ensure its end

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099830501/1100283577" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tony D'Amato, director of the University of Vermont's forestry program, visits an experiment site in the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Emma Jacobs for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emma Jacobs for NPR

Scientists eavesdrop on an ancient river giant: the lake sturgeon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099244600/1099244601" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this photo provided by the New Mexico National Guard, a New Mexico National Guard Aviation UH-60 Black Hawk flies as part of firefighting efforts, dropping thousands of gallons of water with Bambi buckets from the air on the Calf Canyon/Hermits Peak fire in northern New Mexico on Sunday, May, 1. New Mexico National Guard via AP hide caption

toggle caption
New Mexico National Guard via AP

Sarah Peper, Missouri Department of Conservation Fisheries Management Biologist, downloads fish tracking data on the Mississippi River in West Alton, Mo. Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio

Wildfires are causing billions in damage every year and yet many homebuyers have little idea whether their house is at risk. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Is your house at risk of a wildfire? This online tool could tell you

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098813861/1099070475" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With Roe v. Wade primed to be overruled, people seeking abortions could soon face new barriers in many states. Researcher Diana Greene Foster documented what happens when someone is denied an abortion in The Turnaway Study. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Malte Mueller/Getty Images

A landmark study tracks the lasting effect of having an abortion — or being denied one

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098347992/1099420097" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Solar and wind power projects have been booming in California, like the Pine Tree Wind Farm and Solar Power Plant in the Tehachapi Mountains, but that doesn't mean fossil fuels are fading away quickly. Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag hide caption

toggle caption
Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

California just ran on 100% renewable energy, but fossil fuels aren't fading away yet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1097376890/1097376891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript