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A phlebotomist tends to a blood donor during the Starts, Stripes, and Pints blood drive event in Louisville, Ky., in July. Rising numbers of organ transplants, trauma cases, and elective surgeries postponed by the COVID-19 pandemic have caused an increase in the need for blood products. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

A lunar eclipse viewed from California's Trona Pinnacles Desert National Conservation Area. Scientists believe there may be more moons in the galaxy than planets. NASA/Lauren Hughes/NASA/Lauren Hughes hide caption

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NASA/Lauren Hughes/NASA/Lauren Hughes

Scientists think they've found a big, weird moon in a far-off star system

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Students wearing masks board a school bus outside a Manhattan school on Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2021, in New York. Brittainy Newman / AP hide caption

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Brittainy Newman / AP

A COVID-19 home test in the U.S. comes with a swab to swirl in the nostrils. But some users say they're swabbing the throat too — even though that's not what the instructions say to do. "They may stab themselves," cautions Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting head of the Food and Drug Administration. Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The cooling towers at the Stanton Energy Center, a coal-fired power plant, are seen behind a home in Orlando. Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Defending men's champion Novak Djokovic practices ahead of the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia, on Wednesday. Mark Baker/AP hide caption

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Mark Baker/AP

A male ruby-throated hummingbird is one of the birds featured in the board game Wingspan. Elise Amendola / AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola / AP

The Biogen Inc., headquarters is shown in Cambridge, Mass. Medicare says it will limit coverage of a $28,200-per-year Alzheimer's drug whose benefits have been questioned. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Sure a goldfish can mingle in a tank, but some have taken their movement to the next level by operating robotic vehicles on land as part of an animal behavior experiment. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Climeworks factory with it's fans in front of the collector, drawing in ambient air and release it, as largely purified CO2 through ventilators at the back is seen at the Hellisheidi power plant near Reykjavik on October 11, 2021. HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP via Getty Images

A crowd gathers as Nobel laureate John Mather and Northrop Grumman engineer Scott Willoughby speak in front of a model of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope at South by Southwest on March 9, 2013. Alex Evers hide caption

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Alex Evers

Who gets to use NASA's James Webb Space Telescope? Astronomers work to fight bias

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People wait in line to get tested for COVID-19 at a testing facility in Times Square on December 9, 2021 in New York City. Spencer Platt / Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt / Getty Images

A health worker grabs at-home COVID-19 test kits to be handed out last month in Youngstown, Ohio. Starting Saturday, private health insurers will be required to cover up to eight at-home COVID-19 tests per month for those on their plans, the Biden administration announced Monday. David Dermer/AP hide caption

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David Dermer/AP

In this photo provided by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, members of the surgical team perform the transplant of a pig heart into patient David Bennett in Baltimore on Friday. On Monday, the hospital said that he's doing well three days after the highly experimental surgery. Mark Teske/University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP hide caption

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Mark Teske/University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP

Trucks cross the Vincent Thomas Bridge above a container ship at the Port of Los Angeles on Nov. 30, 2021. Transportation, particularly for moving freight to meet high demand for consumer products, saw the steepest increase in climate-warming emissions in 2021. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

U.S. greenhouse gas emissions jumped in 2021, a threat to climate goals

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The driver of an electric car handles the charging cable to charge the car at a public charging station in Berlin, Germany. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images