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Canada, Newfoundland, L'anse Aux Meadows Nhp, Replicas Of Norse Houses From 1000 Years Ago. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR
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The Schuylkill River floods Philadelphia in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida in September. The extreme rain caught many by surprise, trapping people in basements and cars and killing dozens. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Safeway pharmacist Ashley McGee fills a syringe with the Pfizer COVID-19 booster vaccination at a vaccination booster shot clinic on Oct. 1, in San Rafael, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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In this September 2021 photo provided by NYU Langone Health, a surgical team at the hospital in New York examines a pig kidney attached to the body of a deceased recipient for any signs of rejection. The test was a step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Joe Carrotta/AP hide caption

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Joe Carrotta/AP
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California's farmers are pumping billions of tons of extra water from underground aquifers this year because of the drought. But new restrictions on such pumping are coming into force. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Satellites reveal the secrets of water-guzzling farms in California

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How do our brains create meaning from the sounds around us? That is the question at the heart of a new book from neuroscientist Nina Kraus, called Of Sound Mind. kimberrywood/Getty Images hide caption

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kimberrywood/Getty Images

How do we make sense of the sounds around us?

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A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the Lucy spacecraft lifts off from Launch Complex 41 at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station on Saturday in Cape Canaveral, Fla. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

North Dakota ranchers have been forced to sell off close to 25% more of their herds over last year. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

The roots of mangrove trees grow above and below the water's edge. Dulyanut Swdp/Getty Images hide caption

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Dulyanut Swdp/Getty Images

The Mighty Mangrove

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Women rights activists hold up signs as they gather in Washington, DC. to protest the new abortion law in Texas. While she was instrumental to the early abortion-rights movement, many in the crown may not have known the name Pat Maginnis. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

Patricia Maginnis, who was 93 when she died on August 30, may have been the first person to publicly call for abortion to be completely decriminalized in America. Despite her insistence on direct action on abortion-rights at a time when many were uncomfortable even saying the word "abortion," Maginnis is not a bold letter name of the movement. That may be because she didn't seek the limelight and she cared more for action then self-presentation.

Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

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A scenic view of a lake against the sky at night in British Columbia. Earlier this month, a resident of Golden, B.C., woke up to the sound of a crash and found that a meteorite had landed in her bed. Nadia Palici/Getty Images hide caption

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Nadia Palici/Getty Images

Hospitals in Idaho, like St. Luke's Boise Medical Center in Boise, remain full after the summer delta surge pushed many to their limits. Kyle Green/AP hide caption

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Kyle Green/AP

With hospitals crowded from COVID, 1 in 5 American families delays health care

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One of the Twinkies Colin Purrington opened in 2020 - from a box stashed away in 2012 - had collapsed into a shriveled mass. Colin Purrington hide caption

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Colin Purrington

The mystery of the mummified Twinkie

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Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of the World Health Organization (WHO), speaks during a news conference on the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak in Geneva, in March 2020. Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A study by the National Institutes of Health this week suggests people who got the J&J vaccine as their initial vaccination against the coronavirus may get their best protection from choosing an mRNA vaccine as the booster. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images

A study of COVID vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best

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