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Suppressing mosquitoes could give birds like the kiwikiu a chance to survive. “There is no place safe for them, so we have to make that place safe again,” says Chris Warren of Haleakalā National Park. “It’s the only option.”
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Robby Kohley/DLNR/MFBRP

Maui Birds vs. Mosquitos

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A heat dome that began in Mexico in May moved into the U.S. in early June causing sweltering temperatures. Michala Garrison/NASA Earth Observatory hide caption

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Michala Garrison/NASA Earth Observatory

Astronaut Wendy B. Lawrence was aboard the the Space Shuttle Endeavour for the STS-67/ASTRO-2 mission when it launched March 2nd, 1995. NASA hide caption

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NASA

From the physics of g-force to weightlessness: How it feels to launch into space

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This adult elephant in Kenya was named "Desert Rose" by researchers, but does she have her own elephant name? George Wittemyer hide caption

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George Wittemyer

Wild elephants may have names

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Pima County Medical Examiner Greg Hess at his office in Tucson, Ariz. Hess and another Arizona-based medical examiner are rethinking how to catalog and count heat-related deaths, a major step toward understanding the growing impacts of heat. Cassidy Araiza for NPR hide caption

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Cassidy Araiza for NPR

Climate Mortality - Coroners & Medical Examiners

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The statue Guardian or Authority of Law sits above the west front plaza of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 7 in Washington, D.C. Among the rulings the court is expected to issue by the end of June are cases about access to abortion pills dispensed by mail, gun restrictions, the power of regulatory agencies and former President Donald Trump’s bid to avoid criminal charges for trying to overturn his 2020 election defeat. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Astronaut Wendy B. Lawrence was aboard the the Space Shuttle Endeavour for the STS-67/ASTRO-2 mission when it launched March 2nd, 1995. NASA hide caption

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NASA

In this image provided by the Baker County Sheriff's Office, responders aid in rescue efforts after a vehicle went into an embankment on U.S. Forest Service Road 39 on June 3, 2024, in Oregon. A dog helped his owner get rescued after the crash by traveling nearly four miles to the campsite where the man was staying with family, which alerted them that something was wrong, authorities said. Baker County Sheriff's Office/AP hide caption

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Baker County Sheriff's Office/AP

Catastrophic flash floods killed dozens of people in eastern Kentucky in July 2022. Here, homes in Jackson, Ky., are flooded with water. Arden S. Barnes/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Arden S. Barnes/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Climate change is deadly. Exactly how deadly? Depends who's counting

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The illegal wildlife trade is estimated to be a multi-billion dollar enterprise. Live animals that are caught, like this box turtle, need immediate and long-term care at facilities like The Turtle Conservancy. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A trash can overflows as people sit outside of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Your future's in the trash can: How the plastic industry promoted waste to make money

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FWS Inspector Mac Elliot looks over a legal shipment while Braxton, a dog trained to smell heavily trafficked wildlife like reptiles and animal parts like ivory, enthusiastically does his job. Wildlife trafficking is one of the largest and most profitable crime sectors in the world. Estimates of its value range from $7-23 billion annually. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Kyne wearing her hyperbolic plane dress. Author photo by Fabian Di Corcia. Fabian Di Corcia/Fabian Di Corcia hide caption

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Fabian Di Corcia/Fabian Di Corcia

A HeatRisk map shows color-coded risk categories for people confronted by heat that can pose health problems. Excessive heat warnings were issued for more than 20 million Americans late Wednesday, as a heat dome raised temperatures. ‎‎‎
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What is a heat dome

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A Joro spider is seen in Johns Creek, Ga., on Oct. 24, 2021. Populations of the species, native to East Asia, have been growing in parts of the South and East Coast for years and many researchers think it's only a matter of time before they spread to much of the continental U.S. Alex Sanz/AP hide caption

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Alex Sanz/AP
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The Hubble Space Telescope in orbit in 1999, just after a servicing mission by astronauts. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Hubble will change how it points, but NASA says 'great science' will continue

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Sizzling summer temperatures are expected to drive electric bills higher this year. Nearly one in six families are already behind on their utility bills. Brendan Smialowski/AFP hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP

cooling costs

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