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Underwater noise pollution is disturbing ocean life, researchers say

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A woodcut from the 15th century depicts a scene from the Black Death plague, which killed an estimated 50 million people in Europe and the Mediterranean between 1346 and 1353. Scientists say they may have found the origin of this deadly disease. Pictures from History/Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

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Pictures from History/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Abortion-rights protesters regroup and protest following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, federally protected right to abortion, outside the Supreme Court in Washington on June 24, 2022. The Supreme Court has ended constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place nearly 50 years, a decision by its conservative majority to overturn the court's landmark abortion cases. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

The Public Health Implications Of Overturning Roe V. Wade

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People line up outside of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on June 23, as the city makes vaccines available to residents possibly exposed to monkeypox. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Monkeypox outbreak in U.S. is bigger than the CDC reports. Testing is 'abysmal'

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Scientists hope the larvae of the darkling beetle — nicknamed "superworms" — might solve the world's trash crisis thanks to their uncanny ability to eat polystyrene. The University of Queensland hide caption

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The University of Queensland

How 'superworms' could help solve the trash crisis

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A mother holds her 1-year-old son as he receives the child Covid-19 vaccine in his thigh at Temple Beth Shalom in Needham, Mass., on June 21, 2022. The temple was one of the first sites in the state to offer vaccinations to anyone in the public. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Beech trees seen from the forest floor. This image was taken in a forest named Bøkeskogen in Larvik city, Norway. Baac3nes/Getty Images hide caption

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Baac3nes/Getty Images

The cover of Cylita Guy's children book, illustrated by Cornelia Li, Chasing Bats & Tracking Rats: Urban Ecology, Community Science, and How We Share Our Cities. Annick Press hide caption

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Annick Press

The omicron variant, though much more contagious than the delta strain, is still prevalent in the U.S. but is less likely than delta to cause long COVID, according to a new study. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Omicron poses about half the risk of long COVID as delta, new research finds

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Flags at the base of the Washington Monument fly at half staff as the United States neared the 1 millionth death attributed to COVID. A new study points to differences in health outcomes between Republican and Democratic leaning counties. Win McNamee / Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee / Getty Images

US Forces in Afghanistan work with a German Shepherd to inspect a vehicle for explosives. IEDs and other bombs led to brain injuries in service people but appear so far to not increase their risk of CTE. ROMEO GACAD / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ROMEO GACAD / AFP via Getty Images

CTE is rare in brains of deceased service members, study finds

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A drug for HIV appears to reverse a type of memory loss in mice

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Some sexuality educators are pushing for comprehensive sex education, which would include topics relevant to queer students. Aleksandr Zubkov / Getty Images hide caption

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Aleksandr Zubkov / Getty Images