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Sarah Peper, Missouri Department of Conservation Fisheries Management Biologist, downloads fish tracking data on the Mississippi River in West Alton, Mo. Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio

With Roe v. Wade primed to be overruled, people seeking abortions could soon face new barriers in many states. Researcher Diana Greene Foster documented what happens when someone is denied an abortion in The Turnaway Study. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images

A landmark study tracks the lasting effect of having an abortion — or being denied one

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"It's the dawn of a new era of black hole physics," the Event Horizon Telescope team said as it released the first-ever image of supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way. EHT Collaboration hide caption

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EHT Collaboration

More than 19,000 homicides in 2020 involved a firearm — an increase of nearly 5,000 from 2019. Mongkol Nitirojsakul/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Mongkol Nitirojsakul/EyeEm/Getty Images

Firearm-related homicide rate skyrockets amid stresses of the pandemic, the CDC says

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New research could prompt schools to reexamine their investment in Reading Recovery, one of the world's most widely used reading intervention programs. Gary John Norman/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary John Norman/Getty Images

A popular program for teaching kids to read just took another hit to its credibility

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Getty Images

Emotions — They're Not Just For Humans

Scientists have discovered the underpinnings of animal emotions. As NPR brain correspondent Jon Hamilton reports, the building blocks of emotions and of emotional disorders can be found across lots of animals. That discovery is helping scientists understand human emotions like fear, anger — and even joy.

Emotions — They're Not Just For Humans

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A border collie in northern England chases after a flock of sheep to herd them. A new study finds that only about 9% of the variation in an individual dog's behavior can be explained by its breed. Edwin Remsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsberg/Getty Images

Moderna says its vaccine appears to be about 51 percent effective for children ages 6 months to less than 2 years, and 37 percent effective for those ages 2 to less than 6 years. Ole Spata/dpa picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Ole Spata/dpa picture alliance via Getty Images

Moderna asks FDA to authorize first COVID-19 vaccine for very young children

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An image of the planet Uranus taken by the spacecraft Voyager 2 as it flew by in January 1986. NASA/JPL hide caption

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NASA/JPL

Planetary Scientists Are Excited About Uranus

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New research finds that previous studies of mental illness using brain scans may be too small for the results to be reliable. Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Image Source

Firearms were the leading cause of death among children under the age of 19 in 2020. Until then, motor vehicle accidents had spent the last 60 years as the leading cause of death for kids. Brian Blanco/Getty Images hide caption

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Brian Blanco/Getty Images

Taylor Swift, pictured in 2021, is the inspiration for the name of the newly described Twisted-Claw Millipede, Nannaria swiftae. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images; Dr. Derek Hennen/Pensoft Publishers hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images; Dr. Derek Hennen/Pensoft Publishers

A health care worker prepares the current COVID vaccine booster shots from Moderna in February. The company says a bivalent vaccine that combines the original strain with the omicron strain is the lead candidate for a fall vaccination campaign. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Encore: Babies and toddlers know that swapping saliva is a sure sign of love

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A pack of wolves in Yellowstone National Park are spotted from a wildlife tracking plane Courtesy of Yellowstone National Park hide caption

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Courtesy of Yellowstone National Park

A record number of Yellowstone wolves have been killed. Conservationists are worried

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A blood transfusion station is cobbled together after a Russian attack on a hospital in Chernihiv in northern Ukraine. Oleksandr Ryzhenko hide caption

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Oleksandr Ryzhenko

The 405 Freeway is packed with rush-hour traffic last month in Los Angeles. Americans' greatest contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions comes from transportation, mostly from cars and trucks, according to the federal government. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

How much energy powers a good life? Less than you're using, says a new report

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Scientists have analyzed a huge number of brain scans to learn more about how the brain develops, from infancy all the way until the end of life. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

Scans reveal the brain's early growth, late decline and surprising variability

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