Politics NPR's expanded coverage of U.S. and world politics, the latest news from Congress and the White House, and elections.

A crop of candidates are insisting they won their elections, despite not being close

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109051844/1109051847" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The effect the Supreme Court's climate decision may have

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1107260645/1109051937" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Immigration advocates are cheering the Supreme Court's decision on 'Remain in Mexico'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109051809/1109051810" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Supreme Court allows Biden administration to roll back 'Remain In Mexico' policy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109051816/1109051817" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Map: NPR tracked four key influencers who appeared at least 308 events in 45 states and the District of Columbia, often with elected officials, candidates, and grassroots organizations. Nick McMillan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nick McMillan/NPR

Election deniers have taken their fraud theories on tour — to nearly every state

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1107868327/1109051907" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sign marks the facade of the Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. on May 5. A group of senators are asking the DOJ why the agency has failed to file reports on the federal government's compliance with website accessibility standards. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Did the Trump camp help far-right militia groups plan the Jan. 6 attack?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1108913337/1108990060" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The independent state legislature theory was first invoked by three conservative U.S. Supreme Court justices in the celebrated Bush v. Gore case that handed the 2000 election victory to George W. Bush. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Voters line up to cast their ballots in the 2020 presidential election in Durham, N.C. The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a North Carolina redistricting case this fall about how much power state legislatures have over how federal elections are run. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerry Broome/AP

How the Supreme Court could radically reshape elections for president and Congress

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1107648753/1109051883" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), vice chair of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, says Cassidy Hutchinson showed great patriotism when she testified about inner workings of the White House that day. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court curbed the EPA's ability to fight climate change. Al Drago/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Al Drago/Getty Images

Supreme Court restricts the EPA's authority to mandate carbon emissions reductions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1103595898/1109062336" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript