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Cars that are part of the Lyft ride-hailing fleet sit in a lot in Denver on April 30, 2020. The company says more than 1,800 sexual assaults were reported by riders in 2019, and the number of incidents has been rising sharply in recent years. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

A water main break Wednesday left most residents of Benton Harbor, Mich., without water as the city continues to deal with lead pipe water quality issues. Don Campbell/The Herald-Palladium via AP hide caption

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Don Campbell/The Herald-Palladium via AP

Howard University students are entering their second week of protests demanding better housing on campus. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty

Walmart is recalling about 3,900 bottles of Better Homes and Gardens-branded Essential Oil Infused Aromatherapy Room Spray with Gemstones in six different scents due to the possibility of a rare and dangerous bacteria discovered. Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

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Consumer Product Safety Commission

Lockdowns have been eased in the United Kingdom, but now there's a new variant called delta plus emerging. Will it take off the way delta did? Justin Setterfield/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Setterfield/Getty Images

People wonder if they should keep calm and carry on in the face of delta plus variant

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Lev Parnas leaves federal court, in New York on Friday. A New York jury convicted Parnas, a former associate of Rudy Giuliani, of charges that he made illegal campaign contributions to influence U.S. politicians and advance his business interests. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

A 'Help Wanted' sign is posted beside Coronavirus safety guidelines in front of a restaurant in Los Angeles, California on May 28, 2021. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

The Great Resignation: Why People Are Leaving Their Jobs In Growing Numbers

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Tablets believed to be laced with fentanyl are displayed at a Drug Enforcement Administration lab in New York in 2019. The Biden administration is hoping to crack down on abuse of synthetic opioids in part by putting them in the most restricted category or "schedule" under the law. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

A proposed Biden drug policy could widen racial disparities, civil rights groups warn

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Dame Sandra Mason is seen here after she was made a Dame Grand Cross of the Order of St. Michael and St. George during a ceremony at Buckingham Palace in 2018 in London. Before her election as the first president of Barbados, she served as the governor general. She will serve both roles. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Workers remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from Market Street Park in Charlottesville, Va., in July. Initial plans to remove the statue four years ago sparked the infamous "Unite the Right" rally at which 32-year-old Heather Heyer was killed. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images