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Ty Carter fills containers with nonpotable water on Aug. 31 in Jackson, Mississippi. The state's capital is struggling with access to safe drinking water after historic rain and flooding led to a drop in pressure at Jackson's main water-treatment plant on Aug. 29. Brad Vest/Getty Images hide caption

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Brad Vest/Getty Images

Regina Campbell holds her paperwork for knocking on doors to tell residents about issues on the ballot in the fall, including a potential constitutional amendment on reproductive rights, in Pontiac, Mich., on August 6, 2022. Sarah Rice/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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Sarah Rice/The Washington Post via Getty Im

The Michigan supreme court set to decide whether voters see abortion on the ballot

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Debt relief for Black farmers shows challenges of pursuing racial equity with policy

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Philadelphia schools close due to high temperatures and no air conditioning

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Drinking water crisis in Jackson, Miss., continues as residents rely on bottled water

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Life expectancy drops in the U.S. for the second year in a row

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Parents of Uvalde shooting victim Lexi Rubio wade through grief and take action

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Country music legend Dolly Parton, pictured here in March, announced the launch of "Doggy Parton" on Wednesday. The collection includes pet apparel and accessories, some featuring the singer's face. Kevin Winter/Getty Images for ACM hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images for ACM

A child sips water from a bottle under a scorching sun on Tuesday in Los Angeles. Forecasters say temperatures could reach as high as 112 degrees in the densely populated Los Angeles suburbs in the next week as a heat dome settles in over parts of California, Nevada and Arizona. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Employees of HarperCollins Publisher participate in a one-day strike outside the publishing houses offices in Manhattan on July 20, 2022 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, right, and former Republican Sen. Jim DeMint, left, attend a summit organized by the America First Policy Institute on July 25. Meadows and DeMint have both been involved with the Conservative Partnership Institute, a nonprofit raising concerns among tax experts. Oliver Contreras/SIPA USA via Reuters hide caption

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Oliver Contreras/SIPA USA via Reuters

Experts say a Trump-backed charity is pushing the boundaries of tax law

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Chautauqua has a strict set of zoning restrictions aimed at preserving the Victorian look of the community. Though many do, visitors don't have to attend cultural events. If they want they can bicycle, swim or play lawn games. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

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Chautauqua Institution re-examines security after Salman Rushdie attack

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