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National Security

Head of the International Atomic Energy Agency Rafael Mariano Grossi, left, and Iranian Foreign Minister Hossein Amirabdollahian pictured meeting in Tehran, on Tuesday. Grossi pressed for greater access in the Islamic Republic ahead of diplomatic talks restarting over Tehran's tattered nuclear deal with world powers. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

In this photo provided by the Malacanang Presidential Photographers Division, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks during a virtual plenary session of the ASEAN-China Special Summit, Monday November 22. Richard Madelo/AP hide caption

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Richard Madelo/AP

A TSA employee screens travelers at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta, Ga., November 2007. TSA is expecting to screen 20 million travelers this Thanksgiving season. Chris Rank/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Rank/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Armed participants walk at a Proud Boys rally with other right-wing demonstrators in September 2020 in Portland, Ore. Far-right groups celebrated the verdict in the Rittenhouse trial. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

For far-right groups, Rittenhouse's acquittal is a cause for celebration

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President Biden pumps his fists after getting a medical checkup as he departs Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., on Friday. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The covert effort to disrupt the 2020 election was publicly unmasked in October of last year when FBI Director Chris Wray and others held a news conference to say the authorities were aware of the Iranian actions. Now, two Iranians have been charged. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

After reviewing the CIA's priorities, Director William Burns recently announced the establishment of a China Mission Center at the spy agency. U.S. intelligence officials, current and former, recently spoke at a conference about the challenges posed by China's large spying operation directed at the U.S. Ian Morton/NPR hide caption

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Ian Morton/NPR

As U.S. spies look to the future, one target stands out: China

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The International Space Station shown in orbit in 2011. Astronauts aboard the station were ordered to briefly take shelter after Russia conducted an orbital test of an anti-satellite missile that spewed potentially dangerous debris into orbit. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

Marine Corps Commandant Gen. David Berger, pictured in 2019, says that the goal behind the service's new changes is to develop a corps that reflects America. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

The Marine Corps is reinventing itself to reflect America, says top general

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Retired Brigadier Gen. Clara Adams-Ender, the first woman to receive her master's degree in military arts and sciences from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College holds a signed photo of Gen. Colin Powell, the first African American chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Michael A. McCoy for NPR hide caption

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Michael A. McCoy for NPR

Black veterans remember Colin Powell and offer him a final salute for the ages

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Rioters take to the steps of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. An NPR analysis found more Capitol riot defendants may have ties to the Oath Keepers, a far-right group, than was previously known. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Capitol riot suspects had more ties to Oath Keepers than previously known

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The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case centered on the FBI's surveillance of mosques after 9/11. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Supreme Court to hear arguments on FBI's surveillance of mosques

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed and his wife Zinash Tayachew take part in a memorial service for the victims of the Tigray conflict organized by the city administration, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on Wednesday. Ethiopian Prime Ministry Office Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Ethiopian Prime Ministry Office Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

A demonstrator wears a badge for the extremist group the Oath Keepers on a protective vest during a protest outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., the day before the Capitol siege. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Active-duty police in major U.S. cities appear on purported Oath Keepers rosters

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The submarine USS Connecticut, pictured in 2016. Its top officers have lost their jobs over an undersea collision in October. Thiep Van Nguyen II/U.S. Navy via AP hide caption

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Thiep Van Nguyen II/U.S. Navy via AP

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (from left), French President Emmanuel Macron, German outgoing Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Biden meet in Rome to discuss renewed talks over the Iran nuclear deal. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images