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In this photo provided by the Richardson Center, former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Bill Richardson, right, poses with journalist Danny Fenster in Naypyitaw, Myanmar, Monday. Richardson said in a statement that Fenster had been released from prison and handed over to him in Myanmar and would be soon on his way home via Qatar. AP hide caption

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AP
Darian Woehr/NPR

NPR books editor Petra Mayer has died

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U.S. journalist Danny Fenster works out of his van that he made into a home/office in Detroit in 2018. Fenster's lawyer says a court in military-ruled Myanmar sentenced him Friday to 11 years in prison after finding him guilty on several charges including incitement for allegedly spreading false or inflammatory information. AP hide caption

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AP

Britain has set new criteria to protect thousands of red public phone booths. Here, spectators sit on two of the kiosks as a crowd watches a parade of athletes who competed in the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. AFP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Ebony Magazine

Under new ownership, 'Ebony' magazine bets on boosting Black business

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A supporter of former President Donald Trump displays a "Let's Go, Brandon" hat before a campaign event for Terry McAuliffe, the Democratic gubernatorial candidate for Virginia, in Arlington, Va., last Tuesday. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Here's what 'Let's Go, Brandon' actually means and how it made its way to Congress

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Google says minors and their families can ask for an image to be removed from its search results, in a new policy unveiled Wednesday. Screengrab by NPR hide caption

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Screengrab by NPR

Fox News anchor Neil Cavuto has both credited the COVID-19 vaccine for likely saving his life and used his platform to encourage others to roll up their sleeves and get a shot themselves. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Katie Couric, shown here in 2016, reflects on the successes and setbacks she's experienced as a journalist in her new memoir, Going There. Mike Windle/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Windle/Getty Images

After years of trying to be likable, Katie Couric is letting that go

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies on Capitol Hill in April 2018. A trove of insider documents known as the Facebook Papers has the company facing backlash over its effects on society and politics. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Television journalist Katie Couric's new memoir, Going There, is a behind-the-scenes look at her personal life and professional strife in the years she anchored top morning news shows. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP/Little, Brown and Company hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP/Little, Brown and Company

Katie Couric goes behind the scenes in the cutthroat world of morning TV news

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Former President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced plans to launch his own social networking platform called TRUTH Social, which is expected to begin its beta launch for "invited guests" next month. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

ESPN reporter Allison Williams reports from a college basketball tournament at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., on March 8, 2017. Williams said in a recent Instagram video that she is leaving ESPN due to the company's vaccine mandate. Lance King/Getty Images hide caption

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Lance King/Getty Images

In this Oct. 12, 2004, file photo, Sinclair Broadcast Group, Inc.'s headquarters stands in Hunt Valley, Md. Sinclair Broadcast Group said Monday it's suffered a data breach and is still working to determine what information the data contained. Steve Ruark/AP hide caption

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Steve Ruark/AP

The Tribune Tower, the iconic former home of the Chicago Tribune, seen in Chicago, Illinois in 2015. The newspaper lost a quarter of its staff to buyouts after it was acquired by Alden Global Capital in May. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

When this hedge fund buys local newspapers, democracy suffers

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Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, pictured here at a news conference in May 2019, said on Thursday that his administration is pursuing the prosecution of a local newspaper reporter who alerted the government to website security flaws. Jacob Moscovitch/Getty Images hide caption

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Jacob Moscovitch/Getty Images

Former Facebook employee and whistleblower Frances Haugen testifies during a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Capitol Hill, October 05, 2021 in Washington, DC. Jabin Botsford/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/Getty Images

Najibullah Quraishi has won numerous awards for his reporting, including three Emmy awards, a Peabody award, an Overseas Press Club award and a DuPont award. He's currently in Kabul, where he's waiting to hear when he can get a flight out of Afghanistan. Courtesy of PBS Frontline hide caption

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Courtesy of PBS Frontline

A more moderate Taliban? An Afghan journalist says nothing has changed

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