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Fox News host Jeanine Pirro, shown here addressing the Conservative Political Action Conference in February 2017, has been placed at the center of a $1.6 billion defamation suit against Fox by Dominion Voting Systems over false claims of fraud in the 2020 presidential elections. MIKE THEILER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MIKE THEILER/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court held a special sitting on September 30, 2022, for the formal investiture ceremony of Associate Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson. President Biden, First Lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris, and Second Gentleman Douglas Emhoff attended as guests of the court. Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States hide caption

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Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
Cecilia Castelli for NPR

A look inside the legal battle to stop Biden's student loan relief

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SpaceX founder Elon Musk during a T-Mobile and SpaceX joint event on August 25, 2022 in Boca Chica Beach, Texas. Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images

Texts released ahead of Twitter trial show Elon Musk assembling the deal

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eBay former Senior Director of Safety and Security James Baugh arrives for his sentencing in a cyber stalking case at Moakley Federal Court on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022, in Boston. Lane Turner/AP hide caption

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Lane Turner/AP

Diana Toebbe (left) and Jonathan Toebbe entered new guilty pleas on Tuesday in a case involving an alleged plot to sell secrets about nuclear-powered warships. West Virginia Regional Jail and Correctional Facility Authority via AP, File hide caption

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West Virginia Regional Jail and Correctional Facility Authority via AP, File

Montana health officials are seeking to increase oversight of nonprofit hospitals amid debate about whether they pay their fair share. The proposal comes nine months after a KHN investigation found that some of Montana's wealthiest hospitals, such as the Billings Clinic, lag behind state and national averages in community giving. Lynn Donaldson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Lynn Donaldson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Stewart Rhodes, founder of the Oath Keepers, is seen on a screen during a House Select Committee hearing to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the Capitol in June. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

In a big Jan. 6 case, Oath Keepers go on trial for seditious conspiracy

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A Mississippi man is facing a hate crime charge and arson violations after he allegedly burned a cross in his front yard to threaten a Black family. Guenther Gassler/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Guenther Gassler/Getty Images/EyeEm

Allison Case is a family medicine physician who is licensed to practice in both Indiana and New Mexico. Via telehealth appointments, she's used her dual license in the past to help some women who have driven from Texas to New Mexico, where abortion is legal, to get their prescription for abortion medication. Then came Indiana's abortion ban. Farah Yousry/ Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Farah Yousry/ Side Effects Public Media

Protesters march around the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix after the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. A new Arizona law banning abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy takes effect Saturday, Sept. 24. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP
Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images

Econ's Brush with the Law

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Video of Amy Cooper calling the police Monday on a man has gone viral on social media. The man says he asked Cooper to put her dog on a leash in New York's Central Park. Christian Cooper via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Christian Cooper via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR

Alan Eugene Miller is shown Aug. 5, 1999. Alabama officials called off the Thursday lethal injection of Miller because of time concerns and trouble accessing the inmate's veins. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

Bou Meng, second from left, former prison survivor, is helped into the courtroom before the hearings against Khieu Samphan, former Khmer Rouge head of state, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022. Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

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Heng Sinith/AP