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This illustration shows how the thin film of sensors could be applied to the brain before surgery. Courtesy of the Integrated Electronics and Biointerfaces Laboratory hide caption

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Courtesy of the Integrated Electronics and Biointerfaces Laboratory

Brain sensor

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People participate in a mass yoga session on International Yoga Day in Times Square on June 21, 2023 in New York City. The CDC finds about 1 in 6 adults in the U.S. practice yoga. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A new study looks at the roles that African and European genetic ancestries can play in Black Americans' risk for some brain disorders. TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

African ancestry genes may be linked to Black Americans' risk for some brain disorders

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A proposed new rule would ban medical debt from credit reports. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Medical debt announcement

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A heat dome that began in Mexico in May moved into the U.S. in early June causing sweltering temperatures. Michala Garrison/NASA Earth Observatory hide caption

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Michala Garrison/NASA Earth Observatory

Pima County Medical Examiner Greg Hess at his office in Tucson, Ariz. Hess and another Arizona-based medical examiner are rethinking how to catalog and count heat-related deaths, a major step toward understanding the growing impacts of heat. Cassidy Araiza for NPR hide caption

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Cassidy Araiza for NPR

Climate Mortality - Coroners & Medical Examiners

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Nurses Lisa Stambolis and Ashley Gresh of the Neighborhood Nursing team talk with Percy Jones. Members of the nursing team visit his apartment building weekly, and Jones credits them with easing his worries about recovering from a hernia surgery when he couldn't get a timely appointment with his doctor. Dan Gorenstein/Tradeoffs hide caption

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Dan Gorenstein/Tradeoffs

Tradeoffs for Carmel (not NPR One audio)

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Catastrophic flash floods killed dozens of people in eastern Kentucky in July 2022. Here, homes in Jackson, Ky., are flooded with water. Arden S. Barnes/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Arden S. Barnes/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Climate change is deadly. Exactly how deadly? Depends who's counting

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Tick-borne diseases like Lyme disease and babesiosis are spreading in the U.S. Ladislav Kubeš/Getty Images hide caption

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Ladislav Kubeš/Getty Images

Once called Nantucket fever, this nasty tick-borne illness is on the rise

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The biggest predictor of screen time for kids is how much their parents use their devices, a new study finds. Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images hide caption

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Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images

Parent strategies that work to curb tween screen time

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People have been pleasantly surprised to find Affordable Care Act insurance plans under $10 a month since President Biden has been in office. The plans were more expensive and fewer people bought them during Donald Trump's presidential term. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How Biden and Trump disagree over how to address the cost of health care

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Triple digit temperatures arrive on JUNE 5, 2024 in Joshua Tree, California. Much of the southwest is experiencing high temperatures from the high pressure ridge, or heat dome, parked over California. Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images/Los Angeles Times hide caption

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Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images/Los Angeles Times

When patients use telehealth or visit health care centers closer to home, the overall climate impact of health care can be reduced. NoSystem images/Getty Images/E+ hide caption

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NoSystem images/Getty Images/E+

This undated photo provided by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration shows cucumbers recalled for salmonella. Food and Drug Administration/AP hide caption

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Food and Drug Administration/AP

The Biden administration set a new minimum standard for nursing home staffing, but the nursing home industry is suing to try to stop the rule from taking effect. Ashley Milne-Tyte hide caption

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Ashley Milne-Tyte

Biden administration takes steps to increase staffing levels at nursing homes

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