Health Health

Health

Henrik Sorensen/Getty Images

Losing a pregnancy could land you in jail in post-Roe America

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109015302/1109629197" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Kara Beasley protests the overturning of Roe vs. Wade by the U.S. Supreme Court, in Denver, Colorado on June 24, 2022. JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty Images

Doctors weren't considered in Dobbs, but now they're on abortion's legal front lines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109483662/1109667605" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Bryan Peden, an anti-abortion supporter stands outside the Jackson Women's Health Organization clinic in Jackson, Miss., and waves his King James version of the Bible, as he cries out to women entering the medical facility to not have and abortion, Saturday, July 2, 2022. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Abortion rights activists hoist their signs outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on June 24, 2022. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Staying grounded after Roe v. Wade; plus let's talk about fat liberation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1108918948/1109480691" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Europe is at the center of the monkeypox outbreak — and it must act quickly to prevent the virus from becoming established, the WHO says. Here, a medical laboratory technician works with suspected monkeypox samples to be tested at La Paz hospital in Madrid, Spain, last month. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

The new rules will help people get upfront cost estimates for about 500 so-called "shoppable" services, meaning medical care they can schedule ahead of time. DNY59/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
DNY59/Getty Images

A nurse fills a syringe with a COVID-19 vaccine in the Staten Island borough of New York on April 8, 2021. The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday recommended that COVID booster shots be modified to better match more recent variants of the coronavirus. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mary Altaffer/AP

A woodcut from the 15th century depicts a scene from the Black Death plague, which killed an estimated 50 million people in Europe and the Mediterranean between 1346 and 1353. Scientists say they may have found the origin of this deadly disease. Pictures from History/Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pictures from History/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

This mosquito spreads dengue, Zika and yellow fever too. Could these diseases make a human emit an odor that draws the insect in to take a bite? Joao Paulo Burini/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joao Paulo Burini/Getty Images

Why mosquitoes might find you irresistible. Hint: A viral lure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1108939192/1109051931" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sign marks the facade of the Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. on May 5. A group of senators are asking the DOJ why the agency has failed to file reports on the federal government's compliance with website accessibility standards. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Kathaleen Pittman, administrator at Hope Medical Group in Shreveport, watches local TV news discussing a temporary restraining order the clinic won on Monday against Louisiana's abortion bans. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah McCammon/NPR

After a reprieve, a Louisiana clinic resumes abortions for anxious patients

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1108662002/1108900112" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The science isn't entirely settled on whether a rapid antigen test indicates whether a person is still contagious. Massimiliano Finzi/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Massimiliano Finzi/Getty Images