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Molnupiravir, an antiviral drug to treat mild to moderate COVID-19, is under consideration by the FDA for possible authorization. Merck hide caption

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Merck

New antiviral drugs are coming for COVID. Here's what you need to know

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(from left) Kevin Dedner founded Hurdle, a mental health startup that pairs patients with therapists. Ashlee Wisdom's company, Health in Her Hue, connects women of color with culturally sensitive medical providers. Nathan Pelzer's Clinify Health analyzes data to help doctors identify at-risk patients in underserved areas. Erica Plybeah's firm, MedHaul, arranges transport to medical appointments. Kevin Dedner; Kolin Mendez Photography; Aaron Gang Photography; Starboard & Port Creative hide caption

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Kevin Dedner; Kolin Mendez Photography; Aaron Gang Photography; Starboard & Port Creative

Three generations, (from left to right) grandmother Genoveva Calloway, daughter Petra Gonzales, and granddaughter Vanesa Quintero, live next door to each other in San Pablo, Calif. Recently their extended family was hit with a second wave of COVID infections a year after the first. Beth LaBerge/KQED hide caption

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Beth LaBerge/KQED

COVID hit 13 members of their family the first time. A year later it struck again

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Danyelle Clark-Gutierrez and her service dog, Lisa, shop for food at a grocery store. Clark-Gutierrez got the yellow Labrador retriever to help her cope with post-traumatic stress disorder after she experienced military sexual trauma while serving in the Air Force. Stephanie O'Neill for KHN hide caption

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Stephanie O'Neill for KHN

James Bond (Daniel Craig) and Dr. Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux) drive through Matera, Italy in No Time To Die. A scientific review of Bond's decades of international adventures concludes that the famous secret agent has consistently neglected critical travel health precautions. Nicola Dove/DANJAQ, LLC AND MGM hide caption

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Nicola Dove/DANJAQ, LLC AND MGM

Native tribes have responded to the pandemic with creative ways to stay connected. Veronica Concho and Raymond Concho Jr. grew traditional Pueblo foods and Navajo crops with their grandchildren Kaleb and Kateri Allison-Burbank in Waterflow, N.M. Joshuaa Allison-Burbank hide caption

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Joshuaa Allison-Burbank

Booster shots are authorized for all U.S. adults, but some are wondering if they need them. A nurse fills a syringe with a Pfizer-BioNTech dose at a pop-up vaccine clinic in the Arleta neighborhood of Los Angeles. Robyn Beck /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck /AFP via Getty Images

Community clinics say the easing of restrictions on telehealth during the pandemic has made it possible for health workers to connect with hard-to-reach patients via a phone call — people who are poor, elderly or live in remote areas, and don't have access to a computer or cellphone with video capability. Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images

Voice-only telehealth may go away with pandemic rules expiring

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HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra says doctors who are balking at the rules of the No Surprises Act aren't looking out for patients. "I don't think when someone is overcharging that it's going to hurt the overcharger to now have to [accept] a fair price," Becerra says. The Congressional Budget Office estimates the Biden team's rules would push insurance premiums down by 0.5% to 1%. Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

Digital generated image of cut out male head multilayered with covid-19 cells inside on blue background. Andriy Onufriyenko/Getty Images hide caption

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Andriy Onufriyenko/Getty Images

TK splatchcock turkey Derek Campanile / Dad With A Pan hide caption

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Derek Campanile / Dad With A Pan

This Thanksgiving, let science help you roast a tastier turkey

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Safeway pharmacist Shahrzad Khoobyari administers a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot into the arm of Norman Solomon in San Rafael, Calif., in October. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Jason Dean received six stitches and a tetanus shot after he cut his knee in May. In August, his wife, DeeAnn, feared going to the same emergency room where he was treated, delaying her diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Blake Farmer/WPLN News hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN News

The ER charged him $6,589.77 for 6 stitches, a cost that led his wife to avoid the ER

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When Greta Christina heard that Kaiser Permanente mental health clinicians were staging a protest on Oct. 13, 2019, over long wait times for therapy, she made her own sign and showed up to support them. She's had to wait up to six weeks between therapy appointments for her depression. Ingrid Nelson hide caption

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Ingrid Nelson

Americans can wait many weeks to see a therapist. California law aims to fix that

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LiceDoctors technician Linda Holmes checks the heads of everyone in the Marker family for lice, including preschooler Hudson. It cost more than $200 to get the four-person household checked — eyebrows and Dad's beard included. Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN

Some doctors, medical associations and members of Congress are complaining that the rule released by the Biden administration this fall for implementing the law to stop surprise medical bills actually favors insurers and doesn't follow the spirit of the legislation. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images
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