Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

Drug companies often do one-on-one outreach to doctors. A new study finds these meetings with drug reps lead to more prescriptions for cancer patients, but not longer survival. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Oncologists' meetings with drug reps don't help cancer patients live longer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1246054537/1246257369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Venca-Stastny/Getty Images

A cheap drug may slow down aging. A study will determine if it works

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1245872510/1246277665" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Recent research shows nearly 1 in 5 school-age children and adolescents are now using melatonin on a regular basis to help them sleep. Elva Etienne/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Elva Etienne/Getty Images

New guidelines aim to make melatonin safer for kids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1245944613/1246163957" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new study finds that front yards with friendly features, such as pink flamingos or porch furniture, are correlated with happier, more connected neighbors and a greater "sense of place." ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP via Getty Images

When the media covers scientific research, not all scientists are equally likely to be mentioned. A new study finds scientists with Asian or African names were 15% less likely to be named in a story. shironosov/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
shironosov/Getty Images

In March, mom Indira Navas learned that her son Andres, 6, was kicked off of Florida Medicaid, while her daughter, Camila, 12, was still covered. The family is one of millions dealing with Medicaid red tape this year. Javier Ojeda hide caption

toggle caption
Javier Ojeda

Aaron Hunter doing physical therapy at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital's outpatient center in Sarasota on Oct. 12, 2023. After getting shot in the head last June, Aaron struggled with weakness and balance on the left side of his body. He spent months in physical therapy before being discharged in February. Stephanie Colombini/WUSF hide caption

toggle caption
Stephanie Colombini/WUSF

Guns are killing more U.S. children. Shooting survivors can face lifelong challenges

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1244820482/1245495990" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Winston Hall, 9, needs growth hormone to manage symptoms of Prader-Willi syndrome, a genetic condition. A shortage of the medicine has contributed to behavioral issues that led him to be sent home from school. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bridget Bennett for NPR

Persistent shortage of growth hormone frustrates parents and clinicians

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1245154523/1245366983" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medicare enrollees with two or more chronic conditions are eligible for Chronic Care Management, which pays doctors to check in with those patients monthly. But the service hasn't caught on. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

The safety rules being announced and finalized today will hold mines to the same standard for silica dust exposure as other employers. These x-rays show black lung disease. Elaine McMillion Sheldon for PBS Frontline hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine McMillion Sheldon for PBS Frontline

People line up outside a public assistance office in Missoula, Montana, before its doors open at 8 a.m., Oct. 27, 2023, to try to regain health coverage after being dropped from Medicaid, a government insurance program for people with low incomes and disabilities. Katheryn Houghton/KFF Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Katheryn Houghton/KFF Health News

The U.S. is the most lucrative market for drugmakers, but they often pay more in taxes overseas. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Drugmakers' low U.S. taxes belie their high sales

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1244876740/1244878653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The advice for anyone who got their IRS return rejected because a rogue agent signed them up for ACA health insurance: Ask for an extension and file a complaint. Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Lily Padula for NPR

Gay people often have older brothers. Why? And does it matter?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243861703/1244900628" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After using the Lenire device for an hour each day for 12 weeks, Victoria Banks says her tinnitus is "barely noticeable." David Petrelli/Victoria Banks hide caption

toggle caption
David Petrelli/Victoria Banks

Got tinnitus? A device that tickles the tongue helps this musician find relief

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1244501055/1244762356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The author's 8-year-old daughter, Rosy, has a "kids' license," showing she has her parents' permission to ride her bike around her Texas hometown. Michaeleen Doucleff hide caption

toggle caption
Michaeleen Doucleff

Sisters Sofie Elliott (left) and Simone Elliott say that reconciling their memories felt especially important as they waded into one particular period of their childhood — a darker chapter that they still hadn't fully explored but that they felt ready to confront together. Kayana Szymczak for NPR; Lena Mucha for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kayana Szymczak for NPR; Lena Mucha for NPR

Sisters make peace with dark memories through art, science and each other

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243926218/1244509986" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Surgeon Christoph Haller and his research team from Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children are working on technology that could someday result in an artificial womb to help extremely premature babies. Chloe Ellingson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chloe Ellingson for NPR

An artificial womb could build a bridge to health for premature babies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241895501/1244068162" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Denise Lee on her last day of chemo. In addition to chemo and surgery, she was treated with immunotherapy. She's currently in remission. Denise Lee hide caption

toggle caption
Denise Lee

After 40 years of smoking, she survived lung cancer thanks to new treatments

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1244132197/1244265719" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With diary cows getting bird flu, researchers are trying to figure out what mutations could make the virus a threat to humans. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Neibergall/AP
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

About