Goats and Soda We're all neighbors on our tiny globe. The poor and the rich and everyone in between. We'll explore the downs and ups of life in this global village.
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

On November 29, the World Health Organization will convene a virtual summit for its member states to consider the handling of future outbreaks. Pictured above: WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The WHO is seeking a new treaty on handling future pandemics. It could be a hard sell

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Peru has the world's highest COVID death rate. Here's why

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Thanksgiving is a day at the beach — quite literally — for young Liberians. Above, the beach in West Point is a sandy playing field for soccer lovers. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Nyayua Thang, 62, left, stands waist-deep in the floodwaters in front of an abandoned primary school in South Sudan. Members of her village, displaced by extreme flooding as a result of heavy rainfall, are using the building as a refuge. Only small mud dikes at the entrance of the door are keeping the water out. (November 2020) Peter Caton for Action Against Hunger hide caption

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Peter Caton for Action Against Hunger

Two boys stand at the edge of the Buriganga River in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in July. A recent study finds that globally, boys and young men made up two-thirds of all deaths among young people in 2019. Kazi Salahuddin Razu/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Kazi Salahuddin Razu/NurPhoto via Getty Images
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Coronavirus FAQ: What is long COVID? And what is my risk of getting it?

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A nurse in the burn unit of the hospital in Afghanistan's Herat province prepares a topical ointment used to treat and prevent infections in burn patients. Ivan Flores hide caption

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Ivan Flores

Nurse Sandra Lindsay celebrates after receiving her COVID-19 Pfizer vaccine booster at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New York in October. Lindsay was the first person known to receive a COVID vaccine in the United States vaccination campaign — on Dec. 14, 2020. Her vaccination card is displayed at the COVID-19 exhibit in the Smithsonian Museum of American History. Lev Radin/Pacific Press via Getty Images hide caption

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Lev Radin/Pacific Press via Getty Images

A graphic showing projected increasing vaccine stockpile. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Why low income countries are so short on COVID vaccines. Hint: It's not boosters

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A new study suggests that white-tailed deer, like the one here, could carry the virus SARS-CoV-2 indefinitely and spread it back to humans periodically. Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald via Getty Images

How SARS-CoV-2 in American deer could alter the course of the global pandemic

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Winifred Muisyo, right, and her 5-year-old daughter, Patience Kativa, watch Stanlas Kisilu, left, as he installs a TV tuner on the roof of her home. The TV is connected to a solar panel provided by d.light, a company partially funded by climate financing from wealthier nations. Khadija Farah for NPR hide caption

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Khadija Farah for NPR

This Kenyan family got solar power. High-level climate talks determine who else will

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Above: Pakistan is home to millions of ethnic Bengalis, many of whom remain stateless, with none of the rights granted to citizens. Like many stateless peoples, they may live in slums where they bear the brunt of climate change impacts, but they're often overlooked in efforts to help those who are suffering. Asif Hassan /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Asif Hassan /AFP via Getty Images

Wash your hands. A lot. That's the message from public health specialists as cold and flu season arrives. Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Image