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President Biden spent three days in Rome talking to world leaders before and during the G-20. He held a formal press conference before heading to the U.N. climate summit in Glasgow. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Italian prime minister: multilateralism is the answer to COVID pandemic

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Steel ingots emerge from an oven at the Saarsthal rail plant in Hayange, France, on Sept. 13, 2021. The United States and European Union have reached a deal on steel and aluminum tariffs. Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/AFP via Getty Images

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (from left), French President Emmanuel Macron, German outgoing Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Biden meet in Rome to discuss renewed talks over the Iran nuclear deal. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden poses for a selfie with first responders who joined world leaders Saturday for the traditional family photo at the G-20 summit in Rome. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Borgia/AP

In the German language, nouns themselves are often gendered. Cities across Germany, including Lubeck, are now trying to use gender-neutral language by placing a colon or asterisk within words. Marcus Brandt/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Brandt/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

Germany debates how to form gender-neutral words out of its gendered language

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Queen Elizabeth II appears on a screen via videolink from Windsor Castle during a virtual audience at Buckingham Palace, on Tuesday. Victoria Jones/Pool via AP hide caption

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Victoria Jones/Pool via AP

Pope John XXIII with President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who stands at left, during an audience granted in the pontiff's private library in the Vatican Palace on Dec. 6, 1959. Eisenhower was the second U.S. president to meet the pope. Robert Schutz/Associated Press hide caption

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Robert Schutz/Associated Press

91-year-old who called his motel the 'Waldorf Astoria' got invited to Rome venue

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President Biden, pictured leaving the Oval Office on Oct. 15, is traveling to Rome and Glasgow during the second foreign trip of his presidency. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Britain plans to phase out coal. Why then are there plans to open a new mine?

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Julian Assange's partner, Stella Moris, addresses protestors outside the High Court in London, Wednesday. The U.S. government is scheduled to ask Britain's High Court to overturn a judge's decision that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange should not be sent to the United States to face espionage charges. A lower court judge refused extradition in January on health grounds. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

It's a crucial week for President Biden, as he heads to Rome for a G-20 meeting, and then Glasgow for a major U.N. climate summit — all as Democrats in Congress continue to debate his spending agenda. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Biden may face tension with allies over climate, Afghanistan and other issues

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Author Kati Marton explores Angela Merkel's impact on the world in 'The Chancellor'

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