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Europe

Raise Grigorievna Dreama's daughters Malina (left) and Ramina (center) and her granddaughter Monica (right) sit in their room at a temporary Chisinau housing center for refugees, mostly hosting people from the Roma community and other minority groups from Ukraine, in April. Betsy Joles hide caption

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Betsy Joles

Russian-backed Donetsk militia fighters man "Gvozdika" (Carnation) self-propelled artillery vehicles to fire toward a Ukrainian army position outside Donetsk, in territory held by the separatist Donetsk government in eastern Ukraine, Friday. Fighting has intensified in the Donbas region this week. Alexei Alexandrov/AP hide caption

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Alexei Alexandrov/AP

Joe Biden listens to remarks by Finland's President Sauli Niinisto and Sweden's Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson at the White House this week. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Two versions of history collide as Finland and Sweden seek to join NATO

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Ukrainian servicemen from the Azovstal steel plant sit on a bus near a penal colony, in Olyonivka, in territory under the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, on Friday. AP hide caption

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AP

Russia aims to capitalize on controlling the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol

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Ukrainians wait in a miles-long jam full of trucks, buses and cars to cross to the border at Medyka, Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

Millions rushed to leave Ukraine. Now the queue to return home stretches for miles

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Students listen to a teacher during a lesson at Poland's Warsaw Ukrainian School, on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

They Fled The Most Traumatized Parts of Ukraine. Classrooms Are Offering Them Hope

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A woman walks through the Oleksiivska station in Kharkiv, Ukraine. Thousands of residents have been sheltering in the city's subway stations, but the mayor says it's safe to emerge now that Russian forces are retreating. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Russian Army Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, pleaded guilty Wednesday to killing an unarmed Ukrainian man during the first days of Russia's invasion in Ukraine. His case is the first war crimes trial since Russia invaded Ukraine nearly three months ago. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Courtroom drama: Ukrainian widow confronts Russian who shot her husband

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Ima hugs Shakira at a shelter provided by the Nigerians Diaspora Organization in Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

They escaped the war in Ukraine. Then they faced fresh trouble in Poland

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A Russian serviceman patrols the destroyed part of the Ilyich Iron and Steel Works in Ukraine's port city of Mariupol on Wednesday. Olga Maltseva/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olga Maltseva/AFP via Getty Images

Russian army Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, is seen behind glass during a court hearing in Kyiv on Wednesday. He went on trial in Ukraine for the killing of an unarmed civilian and pleaded guilty. It is the first time a member of the Russian military has been prosecuted for a war crime since Russia invaded Ukraine in February. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Symptoms of the monkeypox virus are shown on a patient's hand, from a 2003 case in the United States. In most instances, the disease causes fever and painful, pus-filled blisters. New cases in the United Kingdom, Spain and Portugal are spreading possibly through sexual contact, which had not previously been linked to monkeypox transmission. CDC/Getty Images hide caption

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CDC/Getty Images

Rare monkeypox outbreak in U.K., Europe and U.S.: What is it and should we worry?

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Russian army Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, is seen behind glass during a court hearing in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Wednesday. Shishimarin pleaded guilty to killing an unarmed Ukrainian civilian. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Ukrainian Col. Roman Kostenko stands in a redbrick farmhouse with a gaping hole in one of the walls. This is where Kostenko taught soldiers how to set explosives. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A member of Ukraine's parliament now trains a recon and sabotage unit to fight Russia

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From left: Tomek Mądry, Basia Olszewska and Lilia Nguyen all say the war in Ukraine has made them reassess their own lives in Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

How the war in Ukraine 'changed everything' for a generation of young Poles

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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan arrives for a welcoming ceremony for his Algerian counterpart, Abdelmadjid Tebboune, in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, May 16, 2022. Burhan Ozbilici/AP hide caption

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Burhan Ozbilici/AP