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What's behind the EV culture war? Plus, former child stars including Drake Bell come forward about abuse in 'Quiet on Set.' FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images/Mark Mainz/Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images/Mark Mainz/Getty Images

Science writer David Baron witnesses his first total solar eclipse in Aruba, 1998. He says seeing one is "like you've left the solar system and are looking back from some other world." Paul Myers hide caption

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Paul Myers

The physical sensations of watching a total solar eclipse

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A researcher holds up a sandy De Winton's golden mole. Nicky Souness/Endangered Wildlife Trust hide caption

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Nicky Souness/Endangered Wildlife Trust

A post-reproductive toothed whale mother and her son. David Ellifrit/Center for Whale Research hide caption

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David Ellifrit/Center for Whale Research

Most animals don't go through menopause. So why do these whales?

Across the animal kingdom, menopause is something of an evolutionary blip. We humans are one of the few animals to experience it. But Sam Ellis, a researcher in animal behavior, argues that this isn't so surprising. "The best way to propagate your genes is to get as many offspring as possible into the next generation," says Ellis. "The best way to do that is almost always to reproduce your whole life."

Most animals don't go through menopause. So why do these whales?

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Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

You asked, we answered: Your questions about electric vehicles

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Tina Cordova poses in front of the entrance of White Sands Missile Range where Trinity test site is located. Cordova who is one of five generations in her family diagnosed with cancer since 1945, and runs the Tularosa Basin Downwinders Consortium. Cordova has been fighting for decades to secure compensation for those affected by the radiation from the Trinity test. VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images

Generations After The First Nuclear Test, Those Sickened Fight For Compensation

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Mussels from the U.S., Arctic char from Canada and anchovies from the U.S. are often good options if you're trying to eat seafood that's sustainable. HUIZENG HU/Getty; Cbording/Getty; Israel Sebastian/Getty hide caption

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HUIZENG HU/Getty; Cbording/Getty; Israel Sebastian/Getty

Do you love seafood? Here's how to eat it responsibly

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