Energy Energy

Energy

In this undated photo provided by the United States Geological Survey, permafrost forms a grid-like pattern in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, managed by the Bureau of Land Management on Alaska's North Slope. David W. Houseknecht/United States Geological Survey via AP hide caption

toggle caption
David W. Houseknecht/United States Geological Survey via AP

A set of four tubes known as the "river outlet works," pictured on Nov. 2, 2022, could soon be the only way for water to make it through Glen Canyon Dam. Recently-discovered damage to those tubes has raised questions about their role going forward. Alex Hager/KUNC hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Hager/KUNC

Damage at Glen Canyon Dam has Colorado River users concerned

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1245300155/1245367019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Following a new EPA rule, public water systems will have five years to address instances where there is too much PFAS in tap water – three years to sample their systems and establish the existing levels of PFAS, and an additional two years to install water treatment technologies if their levels are too high. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Chevron operates a major refinery in Richmond, Calif., a community with high childhood asthma rates. It also owns the city's dominant news site, putting its own spin on events, and runs similar websites in Texas and Ecuador. Tracy J. Lee for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tracy J. Lee for NPR

Chevron owns this city's news site. Many stories aren't told

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239650727/1241484118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The coal power plant in Kemmerer, Wyoming, owned by Rocky Mountain Power, is scheduled to be decommissioned next year. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kirk Siegler/NPR

Why a town on the front line of America's energy transition isn't letting go of coal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1240708556/1241357638" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The National Ignition Facility used lasers to generate net energy from a pellet of fusion fuel in 2022. But the experiment is still a long way from truly producing more electricity than it requires. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory hide caption

toggle caption
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Are we on the brink of a nuclear fusion breakthrough?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198909506/1238647983" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The first operating South Fork Wind farm turbine stands east of Montauk Point, N.Y., on Dec. 7, 2023. South Fork Wind, America's first commercial-scale offshore wind farm, is officially open. Julia Nikhinson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julia Nikhinson/AP
Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

You asked, we answered: Your questions about electric vehicles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1196978858/1238364020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Technician Konnor Therriault inside of a Vestas wind turbine in Bingham, Maine. Darian Woods/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Darian Woods/NPR

Wind boom, wind bust (Two Windicators)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197958460/1238421284" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Flares burn off methane and other hydrocarbons at an oil and gas facility in Lenorah, Texas in 2021. New research shows drillers emit about three times as much climate-warming methane as official estimates. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

Oil and gas companies emit more climate-warming methane than EPA reports

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1237962030/1238496236" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Texas investigators say the Smokehouse Creek Fire, the largest in state history, appears to be caused by a downed utility power pole. When it comes to increased risks of starting wildfires, Michael Wara professor at Stanford University says some utilities "are walking into a catastrophe." Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Old power lines plus climate change mean a growing risk of utilities starting fires

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1237063598/1237552147" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A man looks out over the Colorado River near Page, Arizona on Nov. 2, 2022. The seven states that manage the river are divided about how to account for the impacts of climate change in new plans about sharing its water. Alex Hager/KUNC hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Hager/KUNC

As a deadline approaches, Colorado River states are still far apart on water sharing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1237056819/1237144835" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A flare burns off methane and other hydrocarbons as oil pumpjacks operate in the Permian Basin in Midland, Texas. Burning fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas is the main driver of global warming. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

This photograph shared by the Indian Navy on the X platform shows a firefighting team from Indian Navy vessel INS Kolkata responding to a fire on Liberian-flagged Merchant ship MSC Sky II caused due to a suspected drone/missile attack in the Gulf of Aden on Tuesday. Indian Navy on X via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Indian Navy on X via AP

Danny Luckman and Aidan Czerniak of Simply Installs Heating & Air Conditioning cut out and remove natural gas lines from a tattoo and piercing shop. To meet climate change goals, Ithaca, New York wants to switch from gas to electric in the city's 6000 buildings. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

Getting off fossil fuels is hard, but this city is doing it — building by building

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1230109356/1235853359" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Damon Tillman says coal will not surge back in Keyser to the way it once was. Haiyun Jiang for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Haiyun Jiang for NPR

This is what happens when a wind farm comes to a coal town

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1233128242/1233477136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

FILE - A mechanized shovel loads a haul truck that can carry up to 250 tons of coal at the Spring Creek coal mine, April 4, 2013, near Decker, Mont. On Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2024, a U.S. appeals court struck down a judge's 2022 order that imposed a moratorium on coal leasing from federal lands. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File) Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matthew Brown/AP

A wind turbine is seen near Pinnacle Wind Farm in Keyser, West Virginia. This onetime coal town is emblematic of a nation-wide attempt to shift to renewable energy. Haiyun Jiang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Haiyun Jiang/NPR

Wind Power Is Taking Over A West Virginia Coal Town. Will The Residents Embrace It?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910463/1232958322" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A boat sails down the Calcasieu Ship Channel past Cameron LNG, one of three liquified natural gas export plants in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Halle Parker/WWNO/ Southwings hide caption

toggle caption
Halle Parker/WWNO/ Southwings