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President Biden speaks during a White House news conference Thursday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

A Biden-backed shakeup of Democrats' presidential calendar is OK'd by a party panel

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Jacob Wohl, pictured here surrounded by police officers at a 2020 protest in Washington D.C., is one of two right-wing activists who were behind a 2020 robocall scheme that targeted minority voters. Wohl will now face probation, fines and 500 hours of voter registration assistance for pleading guilty to telecommunications fraud. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Top left: Governor-elect Maura Healey speaks on Nov. 8 in Mass. Bottom left: Democratic gubernatorial nominee Tina Kotek speaks with members of the media on Nov. 2 in Portland, Ore. Top left: Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis gives a victory speech on Nov. 8 in Tampa, Fla. Bottom right: Republican U.S. Senate candidate Herschel Walker speaks at a campaign rally on Nov. 16 in McDonough, Ga. Erin Clark/The Boston Globe via Getty Images; Mathieu Lewis-Rolland/Getty Images; Octavio Jones/Getty Images; Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Clark/The Boston Globe via Getty Images; Mathieu Lewis-Rolland/Getty Images; Octavio Jones/Getty Images; Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Can Newly Elected LGBTQ Lawmakers Shift The Landscape For LGBTQ Rights?

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People wait in line to vote on Election Day 2020 in Tombstone, Ariz., in Cochise County. The county's Republican-led leadership has voted to delay certifying its 2022 election results, despite a state deadline on Monday. Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images

Counties in Arizona, Pennsylvania fail to certify election results by legal deadlines

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Lee County voters wait in line to cast their ballots at Wa-Ke Hatchee Recreation Center in Fort Myers, Fla., on Nov. 8. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Don't call Florida a red state yet: Left-leaning groups say their voters stayed home

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A voter cast her vote at the Lake County Fairgrounds on Nov. 8 in Crown Point, Ind. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Democrats made midterm gains in rural areas. Can they keep them?

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U.S. Rep. Mary Peltola smiles before a debate for Alaska's sole U.S. House seat on Oct. 26, in Anchorage, Alaska. Peltola was elected to a full term in the House on Wednesday, Nov. 23, months after the Alaska Democrat won a special election to the seat following the death earlier this year of longtime Republican Rep. Don Young. Mark Thiessen/AP hide caption

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Mark Thiessen/AP

Workers wait to get off an elevator at a coal mine in eastern Ukraine. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Three Takeaways From The COP27 Climate Conference

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Republican Monica De La Cruz-Hernandez flipped the 15th House Congressional District in one of Texas' only remaining competitive districts. In this file photo, she talks in her office in Alamo, Texas, July 8, 2021. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Republicans make marginal gains in South Texas as Democratic power wanes

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Republican state Supreme Court Justice Sharon Kennedy speaks to supporters at an election watch party at the Renaissance Hotel on Nov. 8, in Columbus, Ohio. Kennedy was reelected to the court, this time as its chief justice. Andrew Spear/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Spear/Getty Images

How GOP state supreme court wins could change state policies and who runs Congress

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On Wednesday in Atlanta, Gabriel Sterling, chief operating officer for the Georgia secretary of state, rolls a 10-sided die as part of process to determine which batches of ballots to audit for a statewide risk limiting audit of the 2022 general election. Ben Gray/AP hide caption

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Ben Gray/AP

Georgia election officials breathe a sigh of relief after uneventful voting

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President Biden, campaigning with gubernatorial candidate Wes Moore in Bowie, Maryland, on the eve of the U.S. midterm election. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacy Abrams lost the election this year by a larger margin than she did 4 years ago, leading to questions about the future of the party in the state. Associated Press hide caption

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Associated Press

Georgia Democrats weigh what's next after losing race for governor again

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