Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

School Colors Episode 8: "The Only Way Out" NPR hide caption

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NPR

School Colors Episode 8: 'The Only Way Out'

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Students stand outside Oxford High School, near memorial items that were placed after the November 2021 shooting that took place at the Michigan school. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Zoe Touray (left) Eliyah Cohen (middle) and RuQuan Brown (right) are some of the student activists leading the charge for gun reform. March For Our Lives (left) Sean Sugai (middle) Prolific Films (right) hide caption

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March For Our Lives (left) Sean Sugai (middle) Prolific Films (right)

Debt relief for veterans who say they were cheated by for-profit colleges

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Texas law student talks about her current and future fight for abortion rights

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These college students talked to NPR about applying to schools. Now they've graduated

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School Colors Episode 7: "The Sleeping Giant." LA Johnson hide caption

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LA Johnson

Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks at the White House on April 27. The Biden administration proposed a dramatic rewrite of campus sexual assault rules on Thursday, moving to expand protections for LGBTQ students, bolster the rights of victims and widen colleges' responsibilities in addressing sexual misconduct. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Columbine Principal Frank DeAngelis listens to his students, survivors of the shooting, in April 2019 as he attends "Columbine 20 Years Later: A Faith-based Remembrance Service" at Waterstone Community Church in Littleton, Colo. A dozen students and one teacher were massacred by two heavily armed students. Joe Amon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Amon/AFP via Getty Images

A small, growing group of survivors advises school leaders after mass shootings

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A man started his college degree in prison. Can he finish on the outside?

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

6 things we've learned about how the pandemic disrupted learning

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Daniel Duron and Kenny Butler, who started college in prison, participate in a mountain hike with their Pitzer College classmates and professors after resuming their classes on campus. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Getting a bachelor's degree in prison is rare. That's about to change

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Supreme Court rules Maine tuition assistance program must cover religious schools

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