Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

Hollins University was founded in 1842 on the principle that "young women require the same thorough and rigid training as that afforded to young men." Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block/NPR
Sam Rowe for NPR

Parents are scrambling after schools suddenly cancel class over staffing and burnout

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LiceDoctors technician Linda Holmes checks the heads of everyone in the Marker family for lice, including preschooler Hudson. It cost more than $200 to get the four-person household checked — eyebrows and Dad's beard included. Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN

A painting by artist Sidney King depicting a Dutch ship with 20 enslaved African people arriving at Point Comfort, VA in 1619, marking the beginning of slavery in America. Sidney King/Associated Press hide caption

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Sidney King/Associated Press

Nikole Hannah-Jones won a MacArthur "Genius" Grant in 2017. She is a tenured faculty member at Howard University. The New York Times hide caption

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The New York Times

'1619 Project' journalist says Black people shouldn't be an asterisk in U.S. history

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After two student suicides over one October weekend, UNC students created a makeshift memorial on the Chapel Hill campus. To reduce the risk of suicide contagion, any memorial sites or activities should be limited, experts say, and should not glorify, vilify or stigmatize the deceased student or their death. Ira Wilder/Daily Tar Heel hide caption

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Ira Wilder/Daily Tar Heel

Howard University students gathered on campus to protest poor housing conditions and what they said was mistreatment by the university administration in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 25. Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Internet access has always been a problem for Faylene Begay, a single mother of four living on the Navajo reservation in Arizona. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Students are still struggling to get internet. The infrastructure law could help

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Veronica Vargas helps her children get ready for bed. The three boys sleep in the back of the SUV while Vargas and her partner, Alex, work the overnight shift. Rachel Wisniewski for NPR hide caption

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Rachel Wisniewski for NPR

When a Hyundai is also the family home

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South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster sent a letter to the state's department of education this week about Gender Queer: A Memoir, a book he wants investigated. Jeffrey Collins/AP hide caption

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Jeffrey Collins/AP
Robert Leslie / TED

Emily Oster: Why wasn't the US tracking the spread of COVID-19 in schools?

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When can kids take off their masks in school? Here's what some experts say

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Teacher Keishia Thorpe said she was speechless after winning the Global Teacher Prize 2021 at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris. Thorpe teaches English to high school students whose families have immigrated to the U.S. Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images
Annelise Capossela for NPR