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How the burrito became a sandwich (Classic)

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Tracking 1 million COVID deaths

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Alice Liu, a second-generation owner of Grand Tea and Imports. Camille Petersen for NPR hide caption

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Camille Petersen for NPR

For businesses in Manhattan's Chinatown, inflation is a tough economic hurdle

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CONBUD

Lessons from a former drug dealer

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McDonald's arrived in Moscow when Russia was still part of the Soviet Union. Tens of thousands of customers stood in line when its first restaurant opened on Jan. 31, 1990, at Moscow's Pushkin Square. Vitaly Armand/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Courtesy of Amelia Schmarzo

Buy now, pay dearly?

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Crypto crashed, stocks dropped, and Apple surpassed

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Elon Musk says he wants to see more details about the number of fake accounts on Twitter before his deal to buy the social media platform goes through. He's seen here last week, arriving for the 2022 Met Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Elon Musk says he's put the blockbuster Twitter deal on pause over fake accounts

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Beating the bond market: Luck or skill?

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A sign displays gas prices at a gas station on May 10 in Chicago, Illinois. Getty Images hide caption

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Inflation Is Still High. Why That Hits Low-Income Americans Hardest.

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell speaks during a news conference in Washington, D.C., on May 4. Powell was confirmed by the Senate to a second term leading the central bank. Fighting inflation will define his legacy. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fed Chair Jerome Powell is confirmed for a 2nd term. Inflation will be his focus

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Kevin Dole works from home next to his wife's bureau and near his drum set in the couple's small two-bedroom condo in Nashville, Tennessee. Chelsea Fitzgerald-Dole hide caption

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Chelsea Fitzgerald-Dole

Home prices could fall in some U.S. cities. Here's where and why

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Can inflation ... inflate away debt?

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Imangi Studios

A 12-year-old girl takes on the video game industry (UPDATE)

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A mural of Elon Musk in downtown Brownsville by Alexander Gonzalez-Hernandez. Gaige Davila/ Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Gaige Davila/ Texas Public Radio

SpaceX's plans to launch near Brownsville, Texas, have sent house prices sky high

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The soaring costs of basic necessities such as food and housing are disproportionately hitting people with lower incomes. Here, a house is available for rent in Los Angeles on March 15. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Inflation may be easing — but low-income people are still paying the steepest prices

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Joseph Charles, owner of Rock City Pizza in Boston, managed to survive the pandemic, only to find his place doing even worse now because of inflation. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Restaurants that survived the pandemic are now threatened by inflation

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