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Economy

Jack Taylor/Jack Taylor

Indicators of the Week: Markets Edition

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Percy cashier Carla, who telecommutes from Nicaragua to Toronto, speaking with Planet Money host Amanda Aronczyk. Amanda Aronczyk/NPR hide caption

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Amanda Aronczyk/NPR

Would you like a side of offshoring with that?

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Afghan money changers count banknotes at the currency exchange Sarayee Shahzada market in Kabul in 2015. Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

The financial web connecting Afghanistan, the US, and Switzerland

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President Jimmy Carter signs an emergency natural gas legislation in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., in 1977. ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Memories of the 1970s haunt the Fed, pushing its aggressive rate moves

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When it comes to fighting inflation, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell has said, "We will keep at it until we are confident the job is done." Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Financial markets are a mess around the world. Fingers are pointing at the Fed

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Dan Charles / NPR

The miracle apple (Classic)

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The mighty US dollar (Encore)

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Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen says the Biden administration has plans to help the economy absorb supply shocks. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Why tackling climate change means a stronger economy — according to Janet Yellen

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Instead of going back to a corporate job, Farida Mercedes started her own business. It pays less, but she has more flexibility to spend time with her sons Sebastian (left) and Lucas, ages 7 and 9. Farida Mercedes hide caption

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Farida Mercedes

Women are returning to (paid) work after the pandemic forced many to leave their jobs

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Is your new CEO a liability?

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As the Federal Reserve has raised interest rates to fight high inflation, the U.S. dollar has strengthened significantly. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

You may have seen "shrinkflation" at the grocery store. Now you can find it in the dictionary. This month, Merriam Webster officially added the term, along with over 300 new words. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

How new words get minted

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Housing, yen, supply chains vs. the Fed

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Econ's Brush with the Law

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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on September 21, 2022 in New York City. Stocks dropped in the final hour of trading after Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell announced that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point in an attempt to continue to tame inflation. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Stock markets drop as Wall Street takes a gloomy view of the economy

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An Uber driver arrives to pick up a passenger in Chicago, Illinois. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Donna Dunn, 49, works as the office manager at a healthcare clinic in Booker, Texas. Despite getting a raise, she has struggled to pay her family's bills as prices have risen faster than her paycheck. Donna Dunn hide caption

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Donna Dunn

Workers are changing jobs and getting raises, and still struggling financially

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