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The Bagger 288, a bucket-wheel excavator, digs into the beet fields behind the farm of Norbert Winzen to expand Germany's Garzweiler coal mine, one of Europe's largest open-pit mines. Winzen's family is fighting coal mine operator RWE in an effort to save their village of Keyenberg, which is more than a thousand years old. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

A Coal-Mining 'Monster' Is Threatening To Swallow A Small Town In Germany

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The draft defines ecocide as "unlawful or wanton acts committed with knowledge that there is a substantial likelihood of severe and either widespread or long-term damage to the environment being caused by those acts." Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

This photomicrograph depicts Leishmania donovani parasites contained within a canine bone marrow cell. One of the more dangerous of 20 different species of Leishmania, L. donovani is endemic to parts of India, Africa, and South-West Asia. Dr. Francis W. Chandler/CDC hide caption

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Dr. Francis W. Chandler/CDC

Warmer temperatures are leading to emptier reservoirs across the West, such as Lake Oroville in Northern California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Not Just Wildfire: The Growing Ripple Effects Of More Extreme Heat And Drought

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Lines mark previous water levels at the Hoover Dam on Lake Mead in Boulder City, Nevada, U.S., on Wednesday, June 16, 2021. The reservoir level at the Hoover Dam has plunged to its lowest since it was first filled in the 1930s. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Climate Change Is Threatening The U.S. West's Water Supply

The past year has been the driest or second driest in most Southwestern U.S. states since record-keeping began in 1895. Climate Correspondent Lauren Sommer reports that farms and cities have begun imposing water restrictions, but the water supply will shrink no matter what the weather brings. The supply spans tens of millions of people and the farmland that produces most of the country's fruits and vegetables. As a result, the people who manage the West's complex water systems are realizing that with climate change, they can no longer rely on the past to predict the future.

Climate Change Is Threatening The U.S. West's Water Supply

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Cleveland's Tree Coalition has set an ambitious goal. It wants to plant hundreds of thousands of trees over the next two decades. So far, though, the city's tree canopy is still shrinking. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Bringing Back Trees To 'Forest City's' Redlined Areas Helps Residents And The Climate

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Flora Dillard says the help she received in upgrading her house and cutting her energy bills is "a very good program, especially for people that don't have a lot of income." She has lived in the house for 15 years. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

What's The Best Way To Help The Climate And People, Too? Home Improvement

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Houstonians cool off at the Emancipation Swimming Pool on July 19. Texas is one of many places in the U.S. under excessive heat warnings. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Here are 5 tips to help you stay safe and cool in extreme heat

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Manatees are large marine mammals native to Florida that spend their time grazing on sea grass in shallow coastal areas. Since January, recorded manatee deaths have been nearly triple that of the same period for each of the past five years. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Getty Images

As Seagrass Habitats Decline, Florida Manatees Are Dying Of Starvation

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A few years ago Cleveland linked climate policy and social equity. Now the Ohio city is hoping to use federal funding to help achieve its climate action goals. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The White House Wants To Fight Climate Change And Help People. Cleveland Led The Way

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Visitors feel the heat in California's Death Valley earlier this week. This record-setting heat wave's remarkable power, reach and unusually early appearance is giving meteorologists yet more cause for concern about extreme weather in an era of climate change. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

A wall-mounted thermostat in a California home. New research finds households that can least afford it are spending more than they have to on electricity. Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images

Warmer temperatures are leading to emptier reservoirs across the West, such as Lake Oroville in Northern California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Drought In The Western U.S. Is Getting Bad. Climate Change Is Making It Worse

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