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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Ermias Kebreab: What do seaweed and cow burps have to do with climate change?

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Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED

Jamie Beard: How can we tap into the vast power of geothermal energy?

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Much of the U.S. could see power blackouts this summer, a grid assessment reveals

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Delhi — where most people don't have AC — hits 120 degrees in South Asian heat wave

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'Carbon bomb' projects are hurting any hope of meeting climate goals

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Tony D'Amato, director of the University of Vermont's forestry program, visits an experiment site in the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Emma Jacobs for NPR hide caption

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Emma Jacobs for NPR

Can a new concrete mixture help reduce the construction industry's carbon footprint?

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Traffic on a hazy evening in Fresno, Calif. A new study estimates that about 50,000 lives could be saved each year if the U.S. eliminated small particles of pollution that are released from the tailpipes of cars and trucks, among other sources. Gary Kazanjian/AP hide caption

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Gary Kazanjian/AP

It's a mink... It's a muskrat... It's an otter in the Detroit River

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Soil is a finite resource and a program helps farmers prevent erosion

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Scientists eavesdrop on an ancient river giant: the lake sturgeon

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In this photo provided by the New Mexico National Guard, a New Mexico National Guard Aviation UH-60 Black Hawk flies as part of firefighting efforts, dropping thousands of gallons of water with Bambi buckets from the air on the Calf Canyon/Hermits Peak fire in northern New Mexico on Sunday, May, 1. New Mexico National Guard via AP hide caption

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New Mexico National Guard via AP

Wildfires are causing billions in damage every year and yet many homebuyers have little idea whether their house is at risk. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Is your house at risk of a wildfire? This online tool could tell you

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Commuters make their way through a water-logged street after a heavy downpour in Dhaka. Bangladesh is one of many countries struggling to protect residents from the effects of climate change. Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. pledged billions to fight climate change. Then came the Ukraine war

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