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Given The Choice Between Prison Life And Fighting Wildfires, These Women Chose Fire

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The remains of a burned home are seen in the Indian Falls neighborhood of unincorporated Plumas County, California on July 26, 2021. Extreme weather events have claimed hundreds of lives worldwide in recent weeks, and upcoming forecasts for wildfire and hurricane seasons are dire. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Daniil Medvedev cools down during the break with air from a mobile air conditioner and a towel with ice cubes at the Tokyo Olympics. Michael Kappeler/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Kappeler/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

A firefighter during night operations recently on the Bootleg fire in southern Oregon. inciweb.nwcg.gov hide caption

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inciweb.nwcg.gov

The Climate Change Link To More And Bigger Wildfires

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People ride in the front of a wheel loader to cross a flooded street following heavy rains which caused flooding and claimed the lives of at least 63 people in the city of Zhengzhou in China's Henan province on July 23. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

Record-Breaking Flooding In China Has Left Over One Million People Displaced

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Overhead irrigation of this newly planted crop of carrots is putting pressure on the available groundwater supplies in Cuyama, California. Located in the northeastern corner of Santa Barbara County, the sparsely populated and extremely arid Cuyama Valley has become an important agricultural region, producing such diverse crops as carrots, pistachios, lettuce, and wine grapes. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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George Rose/Getty Images

The Great California Groundwater Grab

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Well water is pumped into an irrigation system at a vineyard in Madera, California. California is suffering from drought, and farmers in the state's Central Valley are pumping more groundwater from their well to make up for a shortfall in water from the state's reservoirs. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Without Enough Water To Go Around, Farmers In California Are Exhausting Aquifers

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A thick haze hangs over Manhattan on Tuesday. Wildfires in the West, including the Bootleg Fire in Oregon, are creating hazy skies and poor air quality as far away as the East Coast. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

A man refuels his car in Paris in 2020. Men spend their money on greenhouse gas-emitting goods and services at a much higher rate than women, researchers found. Franck Fife/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Franck Fife/AFP via Getty Images

April Alvarez, field director for Oregon's Farmworker Union PCUN, spoke at a Portland vigil to honor Sebastian Francisco Perez. The 38-year-old farmworker died during the late June heat wave. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

As Extreme Heat Kills Hundreds, Oregon Steps Up Push To Protect People

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Flooding has led to the collapse of an entire field in Rhein-Erft-Kreis, a district in western Germany. Officials have said a warming climate is at least partially to blame for floods. Rhein-Erft-Kreis District/Storyful hide caption

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Rhein-Erft-Kreis District/Storyful

Wind turbines in a field in Adair, Iowa. Democrats' budget deal would use financial carrots and sticks to encourage utilities to shift to clean energy. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Democrats' Budget Plan Pushes A Shift To Clean Energy. Here's How It Would Work

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Aerial view of a burning area of Amazon rainforest reserve, south of Novo Progresso in Para state, on Aug. 16, 2020. Carl de Souza/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Carl de Souza/AFP via Getty Images

A woman drives through floodwater during heavy rainfall in Miami. A new study predicts that high tide flooding in coastal areas could increase in frequency because of climate change and the lunar cycle in the mid-2030s. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images