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Drought is revealing archeological sites that were submerged when Lake Powell filled

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What this moment before midterms means for the Biden administration's climate goals

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The legal strategy young people are leveraging to address the climate crisis

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A worker carries used drink bottles and cans for recycling at a collection point in Brooklyn, New York. Three decades of recycling have so far failed to reduce what we throw away, especially plastics. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

We never got good at recycling plastic. Some states are trying a new approach

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Black or brown hydrogen is extracted from coal. Gray hydrogen is made by heating natural gas. Both create carbon dioxide. Blue hydrogen captures about 90% of that carbon dioxide and stores it, usually underground. Green hydrogen uses renewable energy to split hydrogen out of water using electricity. Pink hydrogen does the same but relies on nuclear power. Meredith Miotke for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

Hydrogen may be a climate solution. There's debate over how clean it will truly be

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Supreme Court decisions on abortion, gun control and religion likely to come soon

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A block in Massachusetts is the test site for ways to cool cities in the summer

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In 2021, Hurricane Ida cut a path of destruction from the Gulf Coast to the Northeast. Vehicles parked in Philadelphia were submerged after the storm brought torrential rain. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Get ready for another destructive Atlantic hurricane season

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Ermias Kebreab: What do seaweed and cow burps have to do with climate change?

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Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED

Jamie Beard: How can we tap into the vast power of geothermal energy?

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Much of the U.S. could see power blackouts this summer, a grid assessment reveals

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Delhi — where most people don't have AC — hits 120 degrees in South Asian heat wave

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