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Some effects of climate change are irreversible, but there's still hope

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Volunteer firefighters rest west of Yakutsk, Russia, in August 2021. Wildfires are getting more common in Siberia, undercutting the ability of the region's vast forests to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Ivan Nikiforov/AP hide caption

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Ivan Nikiforov/AP

Climate change is killing people, but there's still time to reverse the damage

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A bee sucks nectar from a flower in Berlin, Germany. Bee populations are in decline in industrialized nations across the globe. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The world's insect population is in decline — and that's bad news for humans

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A new report from a watchdog group finds that the platform only labeled about half of the posts promoting articles from the world's main publishers of climate denial. Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images

Workers place geo-textile bags to prevent river erosion on the banks of Padma River in Bangladesh last September. Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images

The first step to preparing for surging climate migration? Defining it

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Tourists visit the South Shetland Islands in Antarctica in 2019. A new study suggests that tourism and research activity in the most heavily trafficked part of the continent are leading to significantly more snow melt. Johan Ordonez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez/AFP via Getty Images

Soot is accelerating snow melt in popular parts of Antarctica, a study finds

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Assessing the Biden administration's progress on climate change

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How countries should prepare for climate migration

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Ski resorts no longer trust there will be reliable snowfall in warming climate

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A Guiera senegalensis shrub grows in an agricultural test plot outside Thiès, Senegal. The shrubs used to be considered a threat to other crops. Now American and Senegalese researchers are conducting studies to see if the shrubs in fact are beneficial. Nick Roll for NPR hide caption

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Nick Roll for NPR

A medical helper takes a photo of the Zhangjiakou National Ski Jumping Center during the Winter Olympics on Feb. 14. Christof Stache/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Christof Stache/AFP via Getty Images

Oregon lawmakers debate heat safety measures

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There's a fight brewing in California over incentives to go solar

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An aerial image shows storage tanks at the Chevron Products Company El Segundo Refinery adjacent to a neighborhood of homes at sunset in Manhattan Beach, Calif., on Jan. 24. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

A bike path near Sausalito, Calif. flooded in January during a high tide. Sea levels will rise between six and 18 inches in different parts of the U.S. over the next 30 years, according to a new report. JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images

Ocean water along U.S. coasts will rise about one foot by 2050, scientists warn

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