Climate NPR's full coverage of climate change and related issues.

Climate

Wednesday

Tuesday

Cleaner, healthier gas burners were developed decades ago. Why aren't they available?

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Demonstrators pretend to resuscitate the Earth while advocating for the 1.5 degree warming goal to survive at the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit, Nov. 16, 2022, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Monday

New cars in California must be zero-emissions by 2035. Can the power grid handle it?

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Recently, Richard Trumka, the commissioner of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), suggested regulating gas stoves. A growing body of research points to health and climate risks associated with the use of gas stoves. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Sunday

The hidden environmental costs of transitioning to electric vehicles

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How forest guards in Liberia protect the sacred rainforests

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Friday

Seeds are seen as students at Eucalyptus Elementary School in in Hawthorne, Calif., learn to plant a vegetable garden on March 13, 2019. The U.S. supply of native seeds is currently too low to respond to climate change-related events, a new report finds. David McNew/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

Wednesday

ICARDA lab employee Bilal Inaty cuts a lentil plant in order to test it for various diseases at the ICARDA research station in the village of Terbol in Lebanon's Bekaa valley, on Dec. 21, 2022. Dalia Khamissy for NPR hide caption

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Dalia Khamissy for NPR

How ancient seeds from the Fertile Crescent could help save us from climate change

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Tuesday

Encore: Agricultural research funding is down, impacting fight against climate change

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Wind turbines, of the Block Island Wind Farm, tower over the water on October 14, 2016 off the shores of Block Island, Rhode Island. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Biden's offshore wind plan could create thousands of jobs, but challenges remain

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Monday

Encore: How climate change is impacting New England's snowplow drivers

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