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A block in Massachusetts is the test site for ways to cool cities in the summer

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In 2021, Hurricane Ida cut a path of destruction from the Gulf Coast to the Northeast. Vehicles parked in Philadelphia were submerged after the storm brought torrential rain. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Get ready for another destructive Atlantic hurricane season

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Ermias Kebreab: What do seaweed and cow burps have to do with climate change?

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Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED

Jamie Beard: How can we tap into the vast power of geothermal energy?

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Much of the U.S. could see power blackouts this summer, a grid assessment reveals

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Delhi — where most people don't have AC — hits 120 degrees in South Asian heat wave

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'Carbon bomb' projects are hurting any hope of meeting climate goals

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Tony D'Amato, director of the University of Vermont's forestry program, visits an experiment site in the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Emma Jacobs for NPR hide caption

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Emma Jacobs for NPR

Foresters hope 'assisted migration' will preserve landscapes as the climate changes

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Can a new concrete mixture help reduce the construction industry's carbon footprint?

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Traffic on a hazy evening in Fresno, Calif. A new study estimates that about 50,000 lives could be saved each year if the U.S. eliminated small particles of pollution that are released from the tailpipes of cars and trucks, among other sources. Gary Kazanjian/AP hide caption

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It's a mink... It's a muskrat... It's an otter in the Detroit River

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Soil is a finite resource and a program helps farmers prevent erosion

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