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Melilla, Spain (October 13, 2022) - A fence runs all around the land border that Melilla, Spain shares with Morocco. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

Life Is Hard For Migrants On Both Sides Of The Border Between Africa And Europe

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Hurricane Ian cause wide spread flooding when it dumped rain across Florida in September. A preliminary analysis found that Ian dumped at least 10% more rain because of climate change. Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinal/Tribune News Service via Getty hide caption

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Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinal/Tribune News Service via Getty

Workers wait to get off an elevator at a coal mine in eastern Ukraine. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Three Takeaways From The COP27 Climate Conference

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Cultivated Meat is an alternative to traditional meat derived from cells in a lab. In this photo, a chicken breast is prepared at Upside Foods. Brian L. Frank for NPR/Brian L. Frank for NPR hide caption

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Brian L. Frank for NPR/Brian L. Frank for NPR

A Taste Of Lab-Grown Meat

The idea came to Uma Valeti while he was working on regrowing human tissue to help heart attack patients: If we can grow tissue from cells in a lab, why not use animal cells to grow meat?

A Taste Of Lab-Grown Meat

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A worker walks past lines of solar panels at the Roha Dyechem solar project in the western northwest Indian state of Rajasthan. Money Sharma/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Money Sharma/AFP via Getty Images

'Sunny Makes Money': India installs a record volume of solar power in 2022

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Bonny Omara (left) works with Edgar Mujuni at Japan's Kyushu Institute of Technology on the satellite that will be used to observe land conditions in Uganda. Bonny Omara hide caption

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Bonny Omara

The COP27 summit went late into overtime, with Sameh Shoukry, president of the climate summit, speaking during a closing session on Sunday. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Did the world make progress on climate change? Here's what was decided at global talks

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More money, more carbon?

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Though wealthier countries are overwhelmingly responsible for climate change, poorer countries are bearing the brunt of the climate crisis, particularly in the Global South. A growing movement demands that rich countries pay for the damage inflicted on these vulnerable communities. SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Steven Khon Khon, of South Sudan, stands on the Spanish side of a four-layered fence dividing Nador, Morocco from Melilla, Spain on October 11. On June 24, Khon Khon and many others trying to get to Europe charged the fence. They were beaten back by Moroccan authorities. Dozens were killed. Khon Khon made it to Spain that day, but his brother remained stuck in Morocco. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

Dozens died trying to cross this fence into Europe in June. This man survived

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Paul Ellis/AFP via Getty Images

The carbon coin: A novel idea

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A methane flare seen in Texas. Methane is an incredibly potent greenhouse gas that is currently released in huge quantities by oil and gas operations, landfills and agriculture. Bronte Wittpenn/Bloomberg via Getty hide caption

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Bronte Wittpenn/Bloomberg via Getty

A view of the glaciers and mountains from the Gerlache Strait on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula in February 2022. Tyrone Turner hide caption

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Tyrone Turner

When he was younger, climate change felt like an abstract concept to Gabriel Nagel. Then a wildfire burned near his home. Eli Imadali hide caption

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Eli Imadali

Coping with climate change: Advice for kids — from kids

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Climate activists at the United Nations climate conference in Egypt call for money to pay for loss and damage from global warming in low-income countries. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Sadio Konte Dior, 20, on the farm where he works outside of Dakar on October 4. He came to Senegal from Mali. On these small farms just outside of the capital, men and women who have migrated regionally grow lettuce and other vegetables. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

What a lettuce farm in Senegal reveals about climate-driven migration in Africa

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Visitors walk in the Green Zone of the UNFCCC COP27 climate conference on Nov. 10 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt. The conference is bringing together political leaders and representatives from 190 countries to discuss climate-related topics including climate change adaptation, climate finance, decarbonisation, agriculture and biodiversity. The conference is running from November 6-18. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Randy Brooks/AFP via Getty Images

Babacar Niang, known as Matador, raps at a recording studio at one of Africulturban's facilities in Pikine, Senegal on April 26, 2018. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

How Senegal's artists are changing the system with a mic and spray paint

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