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A scorched structure and vehicles stand on a property mostly destroyed by the Hermits Peak/Calf Canyon Fire on June 2, near Las Vegas, N.M. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Ecologists say federal wildfire plans are dangerously out of step with climate change

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EPA Administrator Michael Regan says the Supreme Court's ruling is a setback for the agency. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

The EPA prepares for its 'counterpunch' after the Supreme Court ruling

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Shoppers drink juice in plastic cups at a market in New Delhi, on Wednesday. India banned some single-use or disposable plastic products Friday as part of a longer plan to phase out the ubiquitous material in the nation of nearly 1.4 billion. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant shut down in 2019. Exelon Generation blamed the closure on a lack of state subsidies. Such subsidies are growing amid concerns that such closures abet climate change. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Soldiers patrol near the TotalEnergies complex in Cabo Delgado, Mozambique. Last year the insurgency caused TotalEnergies to put onshore operations on hold. But Italy's ENI and ExxonMobil are moving ahead with a new floating LNG ship offshore. It plans to deliver its first LNG later this year. Simon Wohlfahrt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Wohlfahrt/AFP via Getty Images

The flooding of the Saint John River in 2019 marks the second consecutive year of major flooding. Marc Guitard/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Guitard/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister delivers a report on Epic Charter Schools during a news conference June 21, 2022, in Oklahoma City. She will challenge Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt in November. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Wajahat Malik, right, and a Pakistan Navy seaman navigate the Indus River. Malik organized a 40-day expedition down the 2,000-mile river to document "the peoples, the cultures, the biodiversity and just whatever comes our way," he says — including the impact of climate change and pollution. Diaa Hadid/For NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/For NPR

Floating in a rubber dinghy, a filmmaker documents the Indus River's water woes

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President Biden appears with other G7 leaders on Sunday, as a summit at Elmau Castle in the German Alps gets underway. Biden announced a $200 billion U.S. investment as part of a global infrastructure project by major democracies to counter China's investments in developing countries. JONATHAN ERNST/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JONATHAN ERNST/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Scientists hope the larvae of the darkling beetle — nicknamed "superworms" — might solve the world's trash crisis thanks to their uncanny ability to eat polystyrene. The University of Queensland hide caption

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The University of Queensland

How 'superworms' could help solve the trash crisis

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Minerva Contreras, 44, connects climate change to her health because she has a lung problem that makes it harder to breathe on hot days. Keeping her house near Bakersfield, Calif., cool costs as much as $800 a month in the summer. Molly Peterson/KVPR hide caption

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Molly Peterson/KVPR

Americans connect extreme heat and climate change to their health, a survey finds

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Carlos and Jessica Deviana sit in the back of their father's SUV, which they were using as a bedroom after Hurricane Michael destroyed their home in Panama City, Fla., in October 2018. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

You've likely been affected by climate change. Your long-term finances might be, too

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A plume of smoke from the Black Fire rises over the Gila National Forest. Philip Connors watched the fire grow and creep closer to his fire lookout post. Philip Connors/Philip Connors hide caption

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Philip Connors/Philip Connors

A New Mexico firewatcher describes watching his world burn

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The impact of the Sriracha shortage is starting to be felt. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

There's a nationwide Sriracha shortage, and climate change may be to blame

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The cover of Cylita Guy's children book, illustrated by Cornelia Li, Chasing Bats & Tracking Rats: Urban Ecology, Community Science, and How We Share Our Cities. Annick Press hide caption

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Annick Press