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Laura Sifuentes lives in Rosedale, Miss. The government's Child Tax Credit, a monthly payment for many American parents with kids, helped her financially when she had to give up her job to care of her kids, nieces and nephews during the pandemic. Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom/Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom hide caption

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Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom/Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom

Why many Americans continue to struggle despite trillions of dollars in pandemic aid

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Employers are still dealing with administrative chaos caused by ransomware attack on Ultimate Kronos Group last month. SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

A sampling of products Mayowa Aina bought after seeing them on TikTok. Mayowa Aina hide caption

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Mayowa Aina

TikTok made me buy it

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A federal judge on Friday ordered Martin Shkreli, seen here in 2016, to return $64.6 million in profits he and his former company reaped from inflating the price of the lifesaving drug Daraprim and barred him from participating in the pharmaceutical industry for the rest of his life. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Jessica Gerson-Neeves and her wife have been mired in a standoff for weeks with their three cats over a Vitamix blender. Jessica Gerson-Neeves hide caption

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Jessica Gerson-Neeves

Former U.S. Deputy Treasury Secretary Sarah Bloom Raskin, shown here before the opening ceremony of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation finance ministers meeting in Beijing in 2014 is one of the three nominees President Joe Biden announced for the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors on Friday. Andy Wong/AP file photo hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP file photo

Biden announces three more Federal Reserve nominees

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Rolf Dietrich Brecher from Germany

What nails can tell us about the economy

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As part of the settlement, the loan servicing company Navient agreed to pay $95 million for states to offer affected borrowers some reimbursement — roughly $260 each to 350,000 borrowers. Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters hide caption

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Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters

Navient reaches a deal to cancel $1.7 billion in student loan debts

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Amtrak reached a settlement after the Justice Department said the company failed to make stations in its intercity rail transportation system accessible, including to wheelchair users. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images
Ana Galvañ for NPR

22 tips for 2022: To fight "laziness," slow down and focus on your values

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Errata Carmona for NPR

More than 1 million fewer students are in college. Here's how that impacts the economy

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This March 27, 2008, file photo, shows the Pentagon in Arlington, Va. The U.S. Army, for the first time, is offering a maximum enlistment bonus of $50,000 to highly skilled recruits who sign up for six years. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

A Woody action figure lays in a pile of returned goods that are resold at Treasure Hunt Bin Megastore. Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi hide caption

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Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi

No such thing as a free return

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Daderot, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

The beef over price controls

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A postal worker carries packages through the snow on Jan. 3 in Washington, D.C. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

From living rooms to landfills, some holiday shopping returns take a 'very sad path'

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Employees of the Miami-Dade Public Library System distribute Covid-19 home rapid test kits in Miami, Florida, on January 8, 2022. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Why COVID Tests Are Still So Scarce And Expensive — And When That Could Change

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Juby George stands with his wife Shireen Bethala-George at the soft opening of Smell the Curry, a south Indian takeout and catering business at the Flourtown Farmers Market outside Philadelphia, on December 9, 2021. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

New businesses soared to record highs in 2021. Here's a taste of one of them

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