Author Interviews NPR interviews with top authors and the NPR Book Tour, a weekly feature and podcast where leading authors read and discuss their writing. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Author Interviews

John Vercher is the author of the novels Three-Fifths and After the Lights Go Out. Karen Maria Photography/Soho Press hide caption

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Karen Maria Photography/Soho Press

A novelist's time in the MMA cage informed his book on memory loss and identity

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Fasten your seat belts, flight attendant-turned-novelist shares stories from the sky

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A dolphin's sense of echolocation allows it to coordinate efforts to hunt prey, see "through" other creatures and form three-dimensional shapes using sound. Raymond Roig/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raymond Roig/AFP via Getty Images

The human sensory experience is limited. Journey into the world that animals know

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Fourth-grader Lucy Kramer (foreground) does schoolwork at her home, as her mother, Daisley, helps her younger sister, Meg, who is in kindergarten, in 2020 in San Anselmo, Calif. Ezra Shaw/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

Raising kids is 'Essential Labor.' It's also lonely, exhausting and expensive

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Kaitlyn Tiffany, author of Everything I Need, I Get From You: How Fangirls Shaped the Internet as We Know It. Amelia Holowaty Krales/FSG Books hide caption

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Amelia Holowaty Krales/FSG Books

Fangirls rule the internet in 'Everything I Need, I Get From You'

Fangirls often don't get taken seriously in pop culture. But in her new book, Everything I Need, I Get From You: How Fangirls Created the Internet as We Know It, culture reporter Kaitlyn Tiffany explores just how much fangirls have shaped online life. She talks with guest host B.A. Parker about how fans used Tumblr to transform internet culture, how being a One Direction fan enriched her own life and why fandom is more complicated than we might think.

Fangirls rule the internet in 'Everything I Need, I Get From You'

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'On Juneteenth' historian examines the hope and hostility toward emancipation

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A Black woman receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic in Tampa, Fla. Black Americans have died of the disease at a rate more than double that of white people. Octavio Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Octavio Jones/Getty Images

'1619 Project' journalist lays bare why Black Americans 'live sicker and die quicker'

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Huan He/Counter Point Press

Katy Tur chronicled her experience covering Donald Trump's first presidential campaign on her previous book, Unbelievable. Virginia Sherwood/MSNBC hide caption

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Virginia Sherwood/MSNBC

Anchor Katy Tur revisits her high-flying childhood — and the hurt that lingers

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J. Kenji López-Alt's new cookbook The Wok features more than 200 recipes highlighting the versatility of the wok. Along the way, he shares the science behind that versatility and how to master cooking basics. J. Kenji López-Alt hide caption

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J. Kenji López-Alt

Wok This Way: A Science Cooking Show

What's the most versatile pan in the kitchen? According to chef and cookbook author J. Kenji López-Alt, it's the wok! And along with spices, he sprinkles science explainers into his writing. Today's episode is just that — the science of the wok in action. He and host Emily Kwong talk about how to choose, season and cook with one, and why its unique shape makes it so versatile. Plus, we hear how Emily fared cooking one of Kenji's dishes from his new cookbook The Wok.

Wok This Way: A Science Cooking Show

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Simon & Schuster

Short-term profits and long-term consequences — did Jack Welch break capitalism?

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Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, written by Judith Viorst with illustrations by Ray Cruz, was published 50 years ago. Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

For 50 years, Alexander's been having terrible, horrible, no good, very bad days

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Shevaun Williams

Margarita Engle explores what it's like to be an outsider in 'Singing with Elephants'

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Sedaris likens this photo, taken in the Los Angeles County Library Children's Department before they opened, to a Playboy magazine author photo. Anne Fishbein hide caption

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Anne Fishbein

David Sedaris reflects on the driving force of his life: His war with his dad

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Eliot Schrefer's book, Queer Ducks (and Other Animals): The Natural World of Animal Sexuality, is designed to be teenager friendly. It's filled with comics and humor and accessible science on the diversity of sexual behavior in the animal world. Jules Zuckerberg hide caption

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Jules Zuckerberg

What 'Queer Ducks' can teach teenagers about sexuality in the animal kingdom

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Diana Goetsch writes about her later-in-life transition in the memoir, This Body I Wore. Tyler Foltz/Farrar, Straus and Groux hide caption

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Tyler Foltz/Farrar, Straus and Groux

At 58, poet Diana Goetsch finally feels right in her own skin

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Elif Batuman Valentyn Kuzan hide caption

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Valentyn Kuzan

Elif Batuman's sequel 'Either/Or' follows a young woman's sexual awakening

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A Day For Sandcastles Illustrations copyright © 2022 by Qin Leng hide caption

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Illustrations copyright © 2022 by Qin Leng

A kids' story unfolds without words in 'A Day For Sandcastles'

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Naheed Phiroze Patel

'Mirror Made of Rain' looks at how patterns of self-destruction are inherited

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A mural of George Floyd at the intersection where he was murdered in Minneapolis, Minn. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Many know how George Floyd died. A new biography reveals how he lived

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After a stroke blinded one eye, Frank Bruni focused on the future

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