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Animals

Sarah Peper, Missouri Department of Conservation Fisheries Management Biologist, downloads fish tracking data on the Mississippi River in West Alton, Mo. Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio

It is still partially a mystery how Nala, a lost dog, was able to get into the house of Julie and Jimmy Johnson and climb her way into their bed overnight. Julie Johnson hide caption

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Julie Johnson

Msituni, a giraffe calf born with an unusual disorder that caused her legs to bend the wrong way, at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park in Escondido, north of San Diego, on Feb. 10. San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance via AP hide caption

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San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance via AP

Patron poses at an award ceremony in Kyiv, Ukraine on Sunday. The Jack Russell terrier is credited with detecting more than 200 Russian explosive devices since the start of the war. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP
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Emotions — They're Not Just For Humans

Scientists have discovered the underpinnings of animal emotions. As NPR brain correspondent Jon Hamilton reports, the building blocks of emotions and of emotional disorders can be found across lots of animals. That discovery is helping scientists understand human emotions like fear, anger — and even joy.

Emotions — They're Not Just For Humans

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A juvenile California condor flies from a shelf to a branch in the condor reintroduction pen of the Redwood National Park near Orick, Calif., on April 12. Carlos Avila Gonzalez/San Francisco Chronicle via AP, File hide caption

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Carlos Avila Gonzalez/San Francisco Chronicle via AP, File

A beaver throws some twigs on top of his dam as his partner eats some grass near the shore. Taken in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Satellite imagery from Friday appears to show dolphin pens at the entrance to Sevastopol's harbor. The naval base there is important to the Russian military because of its proximity to the Crimean Peninsula. Satellite image ©2022 Maxar Technologies hide caption

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Satellite image ©2022 Maxar Technologies

A Colorado inmate involved in the culling of poultry at a farm as part of a pre-release program has the first human case of avian flu in the United States. Here, cage-free chickens walk in a fenced pasture at an organic farm near Waukon, Iowa, in October 2015. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

A border collie in northern England chases after a flock of sheep to herd them. A new study finds that only about 9% of the variation in an individual dog's behavior can be explained by its breed. Edwin Remsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsberg/Getty Images

Red wolves have been on the brink of extinction since the 1970s. The new six-pup litter gives conservationists a sense of hope for the future of the species. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services hide caption

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services

Taylor Swift, pictured in 2021, is the inspiration for the name of the newly described Twisted-Claw Millipede, Nannaria swiftae. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images; Dr. Derek Hennen/Pensoft Publishers hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images; Dr. Derek Hennen/Pensoft Publishers